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    • Complete: Fragment
    • Institution: MAS
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  • Thumbnail image of MAS-D100046

Record ID: MAS-D100046
Object type: JAR
Broad period: NINETEENTH CENTURY
County: Kent
Workflow stage: Published Find published
Two stoneware jars with feldspathic glaze over yellow ochre dip on upper part of vessels. One carries the stamped mark of the manufacturer: 'Doulton & Watts' Lambeth Pottery'. The firm of Doulton and Watts was established in 1820 as Watts and Doulton, becoming Doulton and Watts by 1826 (Tyler et al. 2005, 12). This particular stamp was used until 1858, when John Watts died, after which the name Doulton appeared alone (Eyles and Irvine 2002, Appendix II), although the company name of Doulton and Watts was used in trade catalogues until at least 1873. Feldspathic glazes were introduc…
Created on: Saturday 3rd June 2017
Last updated: Tuesday 26th September 2017
Spatial data recorded.


  • Thumbnail image of MAS-D100035

Record ID: MAS-D100035
Object type: JAR
Broad period: MEDIEVAL
Workflow stage: Published Find published
Part of a large clay storage jar. Due to the size of the fragment and the degree of marine growth on this item it has been tentatively identified as an olive jar, probably Spanish in origin, and dating anywhere between the medieval to post-medieval period (13th/14th to 18th century), most likely from the latter end of this date range (16th - 18th century).
Created on: Friday 7th April 2017
Last updated: Tuesday 26th September 2017
No spatial data available.


  • Thumbnail image of MAS-100020

Record ID: MAS-100020
Object type: JAR
Broad period: POST MEDIEVAL
County: Kent
Workflow stage: Published Find published
Pottery sherd: a rim sherd from a Post Medieval glazed redware flanged bowl with a horizontal looped side handle. The sherd dates to the 17th/18th century. The manufacture and origin of the sherd is unknown due to the mass production of this type of kitchenware.
Created on: Tuesday 13th December 2016
Last updated: Monday 3rd April 2017
Spatial data recorded.


  • Thumbnail image of MAS-D100074

Record ID: MAS-D100074
Object type: INK BOTTLE
Broad period: NINETEENTH CENTURY
County: Kent
Workflow stage: Published Find published
A collection of four ink bottles; one large and three small. The larger stoneware ink bottle displays a pourer on the rim and is glazed with a feldspathic glaze. This type of ink bottle was introduced in the 1860s and were superseded by glass bottles by the first decade of the 20th century. Cylindrical stoneware ink bottles were made in England in large quantities throughout the Victorian era. The bottles varied widely in size and were not all brown. The larger or master bottles with a pouring lip brown bottles were commonly used for ink. The pouring spout would be used to distribute …
Created on: Monday 24th July 2017
Last updated: Tuesday 21st November 2017
Spatial data recorded.


  • Thumbnail image of MAS-D100232

Record ID: MAS-D100232
Object type: INK BOTTLE
Broad period: NINETEENTH CENTURY
County: Kent
Workflow stage: Published Find published
Four small stoneware cylindrical ceramic inkwells. The ceramic is made of a light brown paste with a salt-glazed surface. The dimensions are 45 mm in diameter by 50 mm high. This type of inkwell was commonly known as a "penny ink" bottle. They were corked, sealed with sealing wax and cost a penny each. They contained writing ink. This type of ink bottle was introduced in the mid-19th century and were superseded by glass bottles by the first decade of the 20th century. Small ink bottles or wells were usually no more than four inches high and did not have a pouring spout like the maste…
Created on: Tuesday 2nd October 2018
Last updated: Thursday 26th March 2020
Spatial data recorded.


  • Thumbnail image of MAS-D100132

Record ID: MAS-D100132
Object type: INK BOTTLE
Broad period: NINETEENTH CENTURY
Workflow stage: Published Find published
One stoneware ink bottle. Ink bottles or inkwells were made of various materials including glass, various metals, various stones, various woods, horn, ceramics and stoneware, and even hard rubber. Prior to beginning of the 19th century, virtually all ink came in ceramic containers which were still commonly used throughout most of the 19th century. Stoneware bottles were superseded by glass bottles by the first decade of the 20th century. Ink bottles of this size are known as the bulk or master ink bottles (https://sha.org/bottle/household.htm, accessed March 2020). The master bottles …
Created on: Monday 23rd October 2017
Last updated: Monday 30th March 2020
No spatial data available.


  • Thumbnail image of MAS-D100128

Record ID: MAS-D100128
Object type: HINGE
Broad period: NINETEENTH CENTURY
Workflow stage: Published Find published
This record refers to the metal hinge and attached timber shown in the top left corner of image one, the other finds are dealt with under separate records. The object is approximately 305 mm in overall length and 204 mm in overall width. For the hinge element of the object only one leaf can be observed from the photo, which measures approximately 64 mm by 127 mm. Given the leaves are likely to be identical in size, this would suggest the overall width is approximately 127 mm making a regular square when fully opened. The metal of the hinge is in generally good condition, with some blu…
Created on: Monday 9th October 2017
Last updated: Wednesday 22nd April 2020
No spatial data available.


  • Thumbnail image of MAS-D100134

Record ID: MAS-D100134
Object type: HANDLE
Broad period: POST MEDIEVAL
Workflow stage: Published Find published
The stem of a silver fork or spoon with a hallmark pattern. The set of four hallmarks located together on the piece of cutlery indicates it was made later than 1781, when this practice was first introduced. Based on this image, this type of spoon/fork is possibly a Fiddle pattern - this refers to the shape of the handle - and is a type introduced in the 1780s and still in production today. The Fiddle pattern means that there are shoulders on the stem near the bowl, which is seen on this example. The lower end of the stem juts out around 90 degrees but this example may have been worn d…
Created on: Monday 23rd October 2017
Last updated: Monday 30th March 2020
No spatial data available.


  • Thumbnail image of MAS-O100099

Record ID: MAS-O100099
Object type: HANDAXE
Broad period: PALAEOLITHIC
County: Hampshire
Workflow stage: Published Find published
Heavily sea-rolled and worn worked flint tool, covered in chalk patination (see third image). The flint measures 80 mm long, 60 mm wide and 30 mm thick, and unfortunately about 20% of the working end has recently broken off. Due to wear and damage on this hand-worked tool it has been difficult to confidently identify. Bryan Popple of Bournemouth Natural Science Society and Museum believes it could possibly be Homo neanderthalensis dating to around 200,000 years bp (before present). The smaller size indicates typical Neanderthal workings in comparison to the larger and older Homo heidel…
Created on: Saturday 5th August 2017
Last updated: Wednesday 23rd May 2018
Spatial data recorded.


  • Thumbnail image of MAS-O100062

Record ID: MAS-O100062
Object type: HANDAXE
Broad period: PALAEOLITHIC
County: Hampshire
Workflow stage: Published Find published
Lower Palaeolithic ovate handaxe dating to around 250,000 years bp (before present). Patina evident on its surface indicates that the tool has been deposited in chalk, therefore it probably originated offshore and was washed onshore (rather than eroded from terrestrial river terraces). This identification was made by Bryan Popple of Bournemouth Natural Science Society and Museum. Matt Leivers, an in-house specialist at Wessex Archaeology believes it is a very rolled and abraded Lower Palaeolithic handaxe that has clearly been around on the seabed for a considerable period of time.
Created on: Friday 30th June 2017
Last updated: Wednesday 23rd May 2018
Spatial data recorded.


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