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    • Period to: MODERN
    • Institution: MAS
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  • Thumbnail image of MAS-F100111

Record ID: MAS-F100111
Object type: AIRCRAFT COMPONENT
Broad period: MODERN
County: East Sussex
Workflow stage: Published Find published
Aluminium aircraft section, heavily corroded and damaged. No identifying marks or plates visible, though two cross member plate remnants present. 870 x 45mm. The lack of identifying marks means that the type and origin of the aircraft cannot be definitively identified from this recovered section. Initially thought to be part of a piston engine support frame from something like a Spitfire fighter, a Dakota transport aircraft, or perhaps one of the multi-engined bombers,this theory was discarded as these are generally circular in section. The double row of rivet holes down one side (pre…
Created on: Wednesday 23rd August 2017
Last updated: Wednesday 23rd May 2018
Spatial data recorded.


  • Thumbnail image of MAS-F100172

Record ID: MAS-F100172
Object type: AIRCRAFT COMPONENT
Broad period: MODERN
Workflow stage: Published Find published
Rolls Royce Merlin 45 gear unit, serial number GU 69 677, with a truncated, heavily damaged and corroded, three bladed propeller. All three propeller blades have survived despite heavy corrosion, though the end of one is missing. The wiring in the propeller cam shaft is visible since the outer dome casing has partially disintegrated. The Merlin 45 engine was used in the Mk. V Supermarine Spitfire fighters, in Reconnaissance Spitfires (PR Mk. IG & P MK. IV), and early versions of the naval version the Supermarine Seafire Mk. IB and Mk. IIC). The Merlin 45 saw active service from ear…
Created on: Friday 27th April 2018
Last updated: Friday 27th March 2020
No spatial data available.


  • Thumbnail image of MAS-O100234

Record ID: MAS-O100234
Object type: BARREL
Broad period: POST MEDIEVAL
County: Down
Workflow stage: Published Find published
This find comprises of the remains of three to four wooden barrels, which were buried in the intertidal sandy substrate of a pleasure beach. The action of the tide revealed the barrels and it is unclear how much of the barrels remain. End of the staves, lengths of timber making the sides of the barrel, are visible and clearly degraded. In some cases these give the appearance of flaring outwards, implying that only the lower portion of the barrel remains. At least one barrel exhibits inwardly projecting staves, suggesting more than half of the barrel remains. There is some evidence for …
Created on: Monday 15th October 2018
Last updated: Monday 30th March 2020
Spatial data recorded.


  • Thumbnail image of MAS-1F5444

Record ID: MAS-1F5444
Object type: BEAD
Broad period: POST MEDIEVAL
County: Kent
Workflow stage: Published Find published
Twenty-six long drawn beads with a single cylindrical central perforation extending along the length of the bead. Varying in size, the beads measure approximately 25 mm in length and 8 mm in diameter, and some signs of wear are visible. The beads all have an opaque white core, cased in opaque red, cased in opaque white and finally cased in translucent blue on the exterior. The inner layers form a star pattern. The diameter cross-section is roughly cylindrical in the centre, whilst at the upper and lower ends the cross-section changes to become faceted in an octagonal shape, allowing th…
Created on: Wednesday 3rd August 2016
Last updated: Friday 30th September 2016
Spatial data recorded.


  • Thumbnail image of MAS-F100109

Record ID: MAS-F100109
Object type: BOAT
Broad period: MODERN
County: East Sussex
Workflow stage: Published Find published
This find is an unidentified curved aluminium sheet that measures approximately 0.94 m by 0.24 m and has a thickness of 5 mm. The sheet displays one riveted hole and one area still exhibits faint traces of red paint. The sheet is covered in a layer of marine growth. Initially it was believed that this object could be associated with aviation remains, however, after consulting our historic aircraft specialist, it was confirmed that the material is too thick to belong to an aircraft. The colour red does not often appear, other than on external markings or Luftwaffe radio equipment, both…
Created on: Wednesday 23rd August 2017
Last updated: Tuesday 8th May 2018
Spatial data recorded.


  • Thumbnail image of MAS-D100065

Record ID: MAS-D100065
Object type: BOTTLE
Broad period: NINETEENTH CENTURY
County: Kent
Workflow stage: Published Find published
Six stoneware seltzer bottles, of a type used to carry mineral water from various Continental (mainly German) spas. The term 'seltzer' takes its name from the town of Selters in the lower Rhineland, one of the original producers of effervescent mineral waters. This cylindrical bottle type was used from the early 19th century through to the First World War. These types of bottles were produced by the specialist potters known as Krugbacker, or pot bakers, in the Westerwald region of Germany. These bottles, which changed little throughout the 19th century, were slender and cylindrical and…
Created on: Monday 24th July 2017
Last updated: Thursday 5th October 2017
Spatial data recorded.


  • Thumbnail image of MAS-D100066

Record ID: MAS-D100066
Object type: BOTTLE
Broad period: NINETEENTH CENTURY
County: Kent
Workflow stage: Published Find published
Four stoneware bottles (three large and one smaller) that were probably used for beer, ale, stout or porter. Stoneware bottles provided the ultimate in protection from the detrimental effects of light but were very heavy. They were produced in Britain in the 1800s and many bottles found in the United States were even imported from here. All of these bottles have a feldspathic glaze over an ochre dip on the upper parts of the bottle giving them a darker colour on top. Feldspars (natural rocks of aluminosilicates) are used in stoneware and porcelain glazes because they fuse only at hi…
Created on: Monday 24th July 2017
Last updated: Thursday 5th October 2017
Spatial data recorded.


  • Thumbnail image of MAS-D100084

Record ID: MAS-D100084
Object type: BOTTLE
Broad period: NINETEENTH CENTURY
County: Kent
Workflow stage: Published Find published
Three cylindrical glass bottles. The two larger bottles are full size wine bottles. One is of the 'Burgundy' type and is most likely Continental. The half-size wine bottle, originally thought to be a champagne bottle, also has a Continental style neck. The Continental style neck appears around the middle of the 19th century (Dumbrell 1983). All are of nineteenth or twentieth century type.
Created on: Friday 11th August 2017
Last updated: Wednesday 6th December 2017
Spatial data recorded.


  • Thumbnail image of MAS-F100103

Record ID: MAS-F100103
Object type: BOTTLE
Broad period: MODERN
County: East Sussex
Workflow stage: Published Find published
This flat-based Hamilton, or 'torpedo' bottle stands 240 mm high, with a 64-mm wide base and is approximately 90 mm wide at the waist. It has a 'bottle logo' embossed on its base. There are possibly other text/numerals that have since worn away. The bottle shows moulding scars on the base and sides. It has a crown top finish. The egg-shaped bottle was first patented by William Francis Hamilton in 1814, the idea being that the bottle had to be stored on its side to keep the cork wet and ensuring a good seal on the reusable bottle. In around 1870, the flat based egg or Hamilton bottle w…
Created on: Wednesday 23rd August 2017
Last updated: Wednesday 23rd May 2018
Spatial data recorded.


  • Thumbnail image of MAS-D100100

Record ID: MAS-D100100
Object type: BOTTLE
Broad period: NINETEENTH CENTURY
County: Kent
Workflow stage: Published Find published
A collection of five bottles comprising two full-size glass bottles, one squat cylindrical glass bottle, one small clear bottle, and one stoneware bottle. All the bottles are believed to be of nineteenth and twentieth century type, although it is difficult to date all but the stoneware bottle. The two full-size glass bottles are thought to be either wine or beer bottles. If the bottles have kicked bases, it would indicate a wine bottle, while a flat base would indicate a beer bottle. The squat cylindrical glass bottle was thought to be a port bottle, however if the base is flat, thi…
Created on: Friday 11th August 2017
Last updated: Tuesday 22nd May 2018
Spatial data recorded.


  • Thumbnail image of MAS-D100207

Record ID: MAS-D100207
Object type: BOTTLE
Broad period: POST MEDIEVAL
County: Kent
Workflow stage: Published Find published
Long necked glass bottle in clear or aqua marine glass. Overall height of 210 mm from base to finish, the height of body from base to shoulder being 120 mm. The finish being of the applied style, bearing a ring of glass approximately 15 mm wide over a further ring extending a further 5-10 mm down the neck. The base of the vessels exhibits a slightly concave punt <10 mm deep. In profile the body appears to be of a flattened hexagon shape, approximately 70 mm wide. the largest pane of the hexagonal shape being 45 mm across. The contraction from body to neck is severe, narrowing to 30 …
Created on: Wednesday 29th August 2018
Last updated: Thursday 26th March 2020
Spatial data recorded.


  • Thumbnail image of MAS-D100156

Record ID: MAS-D100156
Object type: BOTTLE
Broad period: NINETEENTH CENTURY
Workflow stage: Published Find published
Three salt glazed stoneware bottles. This form of bottle was a type used to carry seltzer water and gin. Seltzer water was exported by various Continental (mainly German) spas. The term 'seltzer' takes its name from the town of Selters in the lower Rhineland, one of the original producers of effervescent mineral waters. This cylindrical bottle type was used from the early 19th century through to the First World War and were produced by the specialist potters known as Krugbacker, or pot bakers, in the Westerwald region of Germany. These bottles, which changed little throughout the 19t…
Created on: Monday 23rd October 2017
Last updated: Monday 30th March 2020
No spatial data available.


  • Thumbnail image of MAS-D100133

Record ID: MAS-D100133
Object type: BOTTLES
Broad period: POST MEDIEVAL
Workflow stage: Published Find published
Two clear glass fruit bottles, one ornate green glass wine bottle, one tall brown wine bottle with glass hexagonal base (94 stamped on base) and one black glass bottle. The fruit bottles are 280 mm long and 70 mm wide. One appears to be more encrusted and discoloured than the other, but both are consistent in their shape. They possess straight bodies, abrubtly curving shoulders and straight necks running to applied finishes. One is still stoppered and contains what appears to be olives. Both are indicative of fruit bottles in style and shape. The two wine bottles differ in appearance…
Created on: Monday 23rd October 2017
Last updated: Friday 27th March 2020
No spatial data available.


  • Thumbnail image of MAS-D100129

Record ID: MAS-D100129
Object type: BOTTLES
Broad period: POST MEDIEVAL
Workflow stage: Published Find published
Two bottles with dark glass. Both appear to be 250 mm from finish to base and 50 mm in diameter. One bottle is dark green and the other black. Both have been encrusted and marked with biological activity, which could be mistaken for ornate symbols and badges. Neither are corked or stoppered. Both are very similar in style with straight bodies, rounded and slightly abrupt shoulders that lead into slightly bulging necks before an applied wine finish. From this shape and size, both bottles are assumed to be wine bottles, or perhaps liquor bottles from the 19-20th century. The finish of …
Created on: Monday 9th October 2017
Last updated: Friday 27th March 2020
No spatial data available.


  • Thumbnail image of MAS-D100042

Record ID: MAS-D100042
Object type: BOWL
Broad period: NINETEENTH CENTURY
County: Dorset
Workflow stage: Published Find published
Fragment of white ceramic bowl or lid marked with black and white geometric design and number '23'. Number appears to be hand-painted or stamped. Found loose on the seabed with a little marine growth present. This is a naval issue bowl probably used for drinking rather than smaller, handled cups, as they were more practical on board a ship. The number refers to the mess number, and the bowls were designed to be stored upside-down. The find dates to the late 19th or 20th century.
Created on: Monday 29th May 2017
Last updated: Tuesday 26th September 2017
Spatial data recorded.


  • Thumbnail image of MAS-O100124

Record ID: MAS-O100124
Object type: BRASS
Broad period: POST MEDIEVAL
Workflow stage: Published Find published
One ornate brass piece. The piece has an aperture in the middle, in the centre of a circular disc which is itself recessed slightly into the surface. The disc extends laterally into two leaf-shaped limbs, which are decoratively styled and form curved arrows at their tips. At the end of each limb there is a circular hole, which was likely used to fasten the brass piece to its host object. These holes are countersunk, presumably to accommodate the heads of screws. The piece is approximately 90 mm in length, with a width of 40 mm and thickness of 2 mm. The diameter of the two larger holes…
Created on: Monday 11th September 2017
Last updated: Friday 27th March 2020
Spatial data recorded.


  • Thumbnail image of MAS-D100115

Record ID: MAS-D100115
Object type: CARTRIDGE
Broad period: NINETEENTH CENTURY
County: Kent
Workflow stage: Published Find published
Images of this find were sent to Trevor Parker of the Ordnance Society. He confirmed that these three shell cases belong to a six-pounder Hotchkiss gun. This particular type of gun was introduced in 1884 for use against torpedo boats. They were used during First World War on the Arethusa and early 'C' class cruisers and a few submarines as well as on Monitors M.15 through M.33. Originally French in origin, they were introduced to Britain in 1886 (Tucker 2013). Many were subsequently used as sub-calibre and saluting guns which meant that they were still available in 1939 (Naval Weapons,…
Created on: Friday 8th September 2017
Last updated: Thursday 5th October 2017
Spatial data recorded.


  • Thumbnail image of MAS-100011

Record ID: MAS-100011
Object type: CLAY PIPE (SMOKING)
Broad period: NINETEENTH CENTURY
County: Cornwall
Workflow stage: Published Find published
This is a very worn example of a 'cutty' (short) pipe (total length 115 mm) with a round-based spurless bowl imitating a briar pipe, and decorated with multiple 'thorns' - small pointed protrusions around the stem and bowl. This type of bowl was in use between c. 1850 and 1910 (Atkinson and Oswald 1969: type 30), and the thorn design was one of the many decorative types popular during this period (e.g. Ayto 1994:11; Hammond 2009: figure 7). Clay tobacco pipes were manufactured (using two-piece moulds) in huge quantities in many towns and cities around the UK and were also imported fro…
Created on: Wednesday 28th September 2016
Last updated: Wednesday 12th October 2016
Spatial data recorded.


  • Thumbnail image of MAS-D100085

Record ID: MAS-D100085
Object type: CLAY PIPE (SMOKING)
Broad period: NINETEENTH CENTURY
County: Kent
Workflow stage: Published Find published
A selection of seven clay pipes. Two of the pipes are of 'Irish' type (Atkinson and Oswald 1969, type 31, dated post-1840), with spurs and milled bowl rims, and the remaining five are of a spur-less form copying the briar pipe (ibid., type 30, dated c. 1850-1910). All of the clay pipes are 'cutty' (short) pipes. The spur-less examples are all stamped with the mark 'H B W Russell Co.'. This appears to be the mark of an agent or retailer rather than the pipe manufacturer (as is more usual). H. B. W. Russell may have a connection with Liverpool - pipes stamped 'HBW Russell of Liverpool' …
Created on: Friday 11th August 2017
Last updated: Thursday 7th December 2017
Spatial data recorded.


  • Thumbnail image of MAS-100004

Record ID: MAS-100004
Object type: CLAY PIPE (SMOKING)
Broad period: POST MEDIEVAL
County: Kent
Workflow stage: Published Find published
All three white pipes here are complete, and are of the short or 'cutty' form. Two carry relief moulded decoration featuring Masonic emblems (incorporating the crossed compass and square), while the third is in the form of a male head, wearing a thin-brimmed cap, possibly a military figure. Pipes with Masonic emblems were made from the mid-18th century in the UK, but remained popular into the early 20th century, while the male head falls into a group of more elaborate decorative pipes with bowls moulded in the form of human heads and animals, common in the late 19th and early 20th cent…
Created on: Thursday 28th July 2016
Last updated: Tuesday 29th January 2019
Spatial data recorded.


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