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    • Complete: Fragment
    • Institution: MAS
    • Show this many records per page: 10
    • County: Kent
    • Page: 5

  • Thumbnail image of MAS-D100054

Record ID: MAS-D100054
Object type: JUG
Broad period: NINETEENTH CENTURY
County: Kent
Workflow stage: Published Find published
Four milk jugs with a Chinese style design and a light grey coloured pattern and appear to be made of porcelain (although this has not been confirmed). Similar in decorative style to the bowls recorded as MAS-D100047, it is assumed that the these milk jugs were made by either Charles Meigh of Hanley, Staffordshire (1835-49), the preceding company, J. Meigh and Son (c.1805-34), or the succeeding company, Charles Meigh and Son (1851-61) (Godden 1964, 428-429).
Created on: Sunday 4th June 2017
Last updated: Tuesday 26th September 2017
Spatial data recorded.


  • Thumbnail image of MAS-D100048

Record ID: MAS-D100048
Object type: CUP
Broad period: NINETEENTH CENTURY
County: Kent
Workflow stage: Published Find published
Eleven teacups measuring 4 inches x 3 inches in size. The cups have a Chinese style design with a light grey colour pattern, and appear to be made of porcelain (although this has not been confirmed). Similar in decorative style to the bowls recorded as MAS-D100047, it is assumed that these teacups were made by either Charles Meigh of Hanley, Staffordshire (1835-49), the preceding company, J. Meigh and Son (c.1805-34), or the succeeding company, Charles Meigh and Son (1851-61) (Godden 1964, 428-429).
Created on: Sunday 4th June 2017
Last updated: Tuesday 26th September 2017
Spatial data recorded.


  • Thumbnail image of MAS-D100047

Record ID: MAS-D100047
Object type: BOWL
Broad period: NINETEENTH CENTURY
County: Kent
Workflow stage: Published Find published
Seven Chinese style bowls most likely to be made of porcelain. There is a parallel for the base mark that looks as though it's imitating Chinese porcelain marks. This is the mark of Charles Meigh of Hanley, Staffordshire, operating between 1835-49, but it was also used by the preceding company, J. Meigh and Son (c.1805-34) and the succeeding company, Charles Meigh and Son (1851-61) (Godden 1964, 428-429). The CM mark in the '..CASTER' stamp suggests that it's Charles Meigh, which puts the date just before the wreck date.
Created on: Saturday 3rd June 2017
Last updated: Tuesday 26th September 2017
Spatial data recorded.


  • Thumbnail image of MAS-D100046

Record ID: MAS-D100046
Object type: JAR
Broad period: NINETEENTH CENTURY
County: Kent
Workflow stage: Published Find published
Two stoneware jars with feldspathic glaze over yellow ochre dip on upper part of vessels. One carries the stamped mark of the manufacturer: 'Doulton & Watts' Lambeth Pottery'. The firm of Doulton and Watts was established in 1820 as Watts and Doulton, becoming Doulton and Watts by 1826 (Tyler et al. 2005, 12). This particular stamp was used until 1858, when John Watts died, after which the name Doulton appeared alone (Eyles and Irvine 2002, Appendix II), although the company name of Doulton and Watts was used in trade catalogues until at least 1873. Feldspathic glazes were introduc…
Created on: Saturday 3rd June 2017
Last updated: Tuesday 26th September 2017
Spatial data recorded.


  • Thumbnail image of MAS-O100041

Record ID: MAS-O100041
Object type: CANDLESTICK
Broad period: NINETEENTH CENTURY
County: Kent
Workflow stage: Published Find published
One green glass candlestick measuring 5.5 inches high and 3.5 inches wide. This candlestick is thought to date to the 19th century.
Created on: Monday 29th May 2017
Last updated: Tuesday 26th September 2017
Spatial data recorded.


  • Thumbnail image of MAS-O100053

Record ID: MAS-O100053
Object type: BOTTLE
Broad period: POST MEDIEVAL
County: Kent
Workflow stage: Published Find published
One gin bottle measuring 11 inches high by 3 1/2 inches wide. This square, mould-blown 'case bottle', has the typical tapering profile. The square shape enabled the bottles to be packed more efficiently in a case than round bottles, and the tapering profile stops them from sticking when removed from the case. They were used for gin (although undoubtedly also sometimes for other spirits or wine). Square case bottles were made in Europe from the middle of the 17th century, but the tapering form seems to have become more common in the 19th century. From the 1880s the bottles were machine …
Created on: Monday 29th May 2017
Last updated: Monday 19th March 2018
Spatial data recorded.


  • Thumbnail image of MAS-D100039

Record ID: MAS-D100039
Object type: CANDLESTICK
Broad period: NINETEENTH CENTURY
County: Kent
Workflow stage: Published Find published
Two mass produced glass candlesticks; one blue and one green that is badly damaged presumably having spent at least a century underwater. No further information is known about them at this time.
Created on: Monday 22nd May 2017
Last updated: Tuesday 26th September 2017
Spatial data recorded.


  • Thumbnail image of MAS-D100051

Record ID: MAS-D100051
Object type: DRINKING VESSEL
Broad period: POST MEDIEVAL
County: Kent
Workflow stage: Published Find published
One ivy leaf patterned teacup marked with the Davenport logo. This transfer printed refined ware (either pearlware or whiteware) cup dates to the 19th century. John Davenport acquired his own pottery in 1794, initially producing cream coloured blue-printed earthernware. Within 12 years the company's reputation and the quality of its porcelain was such that the future King George IV was ordering services from the company. John Davenport retired in 1830 and the company was continued to be run by his sons and their children until 1887 when the factory closed and the company was acquired b…
Created on: Sunday 21st May 2017
Last updated: Tuesday 26th September 2017
Spatial data recorded.


  • Thumbnail image of MAS-D100038

Record ID: MAS-D100038
Object type: BOTTLE
Broad period: POST MEDIEVAL
County: Kent
Workflow stage: Published Find published
Four glass bottles that are all square, mould-blown 'case bottles', with a typical tapering profile. The square shape enabled them to be packed more efficiently in a case than round bottles, and the tapering profile stopped them from sticking when removed from the case. These were used for gin (although undoubtedly also sometimes for other spirits or wine). Square case bottles were made in Europe from the middle of the 17th century, but the tapering form seems to have become more common in the 19th century. From the 1880s the bottles were machine made, and the rims properly finished - …
Created on: Sunday 21st May 2017
Last updated: Tuesday 26th September 2017
Spatial data recorded.


  • Thumbnail image of MAS-100020

Record ID: MAS-100020
Object type: JAR
Broad period: POST MEDIEVAL
County: Kent
Workflow stage: Published Find published
Pottery sherd: a rim sherd from a Post Medieval glazed redware flanged bowl with a horizontal looped side handle. The sherd dates to the 17th/18th century. The manufacture and origin of the sherd is unknown due to the mass production of this type of kitchenware.
Created on: Tuesday 13th December 2016
Last updated: Monday 3rd April 2017
Spatial data recorded.


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