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    • Object type: BOTTLE

  • Thumbnail image of MAS-D100231

Record ID: MAS-D100231
Object type: BOTTLE
Broad period: POST MEDIEVAL
County: Kent
Workflow stage: Published Find published
Brown ceramic bottle with a glazed surface. It was intended to contain gin of Dutch origin. The bottle measures 310 mm long and has a diameter of 85 mm with a ring type handle on the neck of the bottle. The bottle is printed with the phrase 'WYNAND FOCKINK' 'AMSTERDAM'. In Amsterdam, Wynand Focknik has been making distinctive hand-crafted liqueurs and jenevers (Dutch gin) since 1679 (Greenberg 2012). In the 17th century, when the Dutch East Indiaman ships brought herbs, spices and sugar to Amsterdam, distillers started distilling liqueurs on a large scale. The city had become very pro…
Created on: Tuesday 2nd October 2018
Last updated: Wednesday 8th April 2020
Spatial data recorded.


  • Thumbnail image of MAS-D100230

Record ID: MAS-D100230
Object type: BOTTLE
Broad period: NINETEENTH CENTURY
County: Kent
Workflow stage: Published Find published
Three bottles of blown glass. The frst two bottles are torpedo or HamiltonĀ“s type bottle (Hamilton introduced this type of blow molding) from the mid-nineteenth century dedicated to containing carbonated water or 'soda'. Both are light blue/green 'aqua' glass and measure 250 mm long and have a diameter of 75 mm with a 'bottom-weighted' blob finish. The inscription "Aerated Water" "Bombay" makes reference to the content and place of distribution, something that manufacturers of this type of packaging commonly did. The design ensured that the bottles would be stored on their side, keepi…
Created on: Tuesday 2nd October 2018
Last updated: Wednesday 1st April 2020
Spatial data recorded.


  • Thumbnail image of MAS-D100227

Record ID: MAS-D100227
Object type: BOTTLE
Broad period: NINETEENTH CENTURY
County: Kent
Workflow stage: Published Find published
Bordeaux style bottle manufactured in clear aquamarine coloured glass, though weathering has caused the colours to distort and becom pearlescent towards the base of the vessel. It has a wide and straight neck and is finished in the applied ring or champagne style. The body is cylindrical, with low profile rounded shoulders. The height of the bottle is approximately 230 mm, the diameter of the body 60 mm and the neck 30 mm. Though this bottle is smaller than the more common 300 mm tall, 750 ml wine bottles it is most likely a wine bottle. It's clear colour suggests a dessert or sweet wi…
Created on: Tuesday 25th September 2018
Last updated: Thursday 26th March 2020
Spatial data recorded.


  • Thumbnail image of MAS-D100207

Record ID: MAS-D100207
Object type: BOTTLE
Broad period: POST MEDIEVAL
County: Kent
Workflow stage: Published Find published
Long necked glass bottle in clear or aqua marine glass. Overall height of 210 mm from base to finish, the height of body from base to shoulder being 120 mm. The finish being of the applied style, bearing a ring of glass approximately 15 mm wide over a further ring extending a further 5-10 mm down the neck. The base of the vessels exhibits a slightly concave punt <10 mm deep. In profile the body appears to be of a flattened hexagon shape, approximately 70 mm wide. the largest pane of the hexagonal shape being 45 mm across. The contraction from body to neck is severe, narrowing to 30 …
Created on: Wednesday 29th August 2018
Last updated: Thursday 26th March 2020
Spatial data recorded.


  • Thumbnail image of MAS-D100199

Record ID: MAS-D100199
Object type: BOTTLE
Broad period: NINETEENTH CENTURY
Workflow stage: Published Find published
This find is a small medicine style bottle in green glass. No scale was provided but these vessels are usually 160 - 190 mm in overall height. The vessel is flat bottomed with a rectangular shape in plan, with the short sides being rounded. it has a short but wide neck ending in a bead type finish, common to medicine bottles. Embossed on the shoulders of the vessel is the word KEPLER, which refers to the product which it contained. The base is embossed with SNOW HILL, B. W. & Co, LONDON, which refers to the manufacturer and their factory in London. The condition of the vessel is go…
Created on: Wednesday 4th July 2018
Last updated: Wednesday 19th February 2020
No spatial data available.


  • Thumbnail image of MAS-D100197

Record ID: MAS-D100197
Object type: BOTTLE
Broad period: POST MEDIEVAL
County: Kent
Workflow stage: Published Find published
Six glass gin bottles. 'Case gin' or 'taper gin' bottles have a square cross section that means that packing became more effective than with round bottles. The bodies taper wider towards a sharp shoulder, short neck and a champagne finish. The bottles are olive green in colour, and are in a fair condition despite encrusting towards the neck. This shape and style of bottle originated in and was commonly made in Europe at least as early as the mid-17th century. These examples do not exhibit the bevelled corners generally seen on bottles of the 1860s or later and may therefore be earlier …
Created on: Wednesday 4th July 2018
Last updated: Thursday 26th March 2020
Spatial data recorded.


  • Thumbnail image of MAS-D100156

Record ID: MAS-D100156
Object type: BOTTLE
Broad period: NINETEENTH CENTURY
Workflow stage: Published Find published
Three salt glazed stoneware bottles. This form of bottle was a type used to carry seltzer water and gin. Seltzer water was exported by various Continental (mainly German) spas. The term 'seltzer' takes its name from the town of Selters in the lower Rhineland, one of the original producers of effervescent mineral waters. This cylindrical bottle type was used from the early 19th century through to the First World War and were produced by the specialist potters known as Krugbacker, or pot bakers, in the Westerwald region of Germany. These bottles, which changed little throughout the 19t…
Created on: Monday 23rd October 2017
Last updated: Monday 30th March 2020
No spatial data available.


  • Thumbnail image of MAS-F100103

Record ID: MAS-F100103
Object type: BOTTLE
Broad period: MODERN
County: East Sussex
Workflow stage: Published Find published
This flat-based Hamilton, or 'torpedo' bottle stands 240 mm high, with a 64-mm wide base and is approximately 90 mm wide at the waist. It has a 'bottle logo' embossed on its base. There are possibly other text/numerals that have since worn away. The bottle shows moulding scars on the base and sides. It has a crown top finish. The egg-shaped bottle was first patented by William Francis Hamilton in 1814, the idea being that the bottle had to be stored on its side to keep the cork wet and ensuring a good seal on the reusable bottle. In around 1870, the flat based egg or Hamilton bottle w…
Created on: Wednesday 23rd August 2017
Last updated: Wednesday 23rd May 2018
Spatial data recorded.


  • Thumbnail image of MAS-D100084

Record ID: MAS-D100084
Object type: BOTTLE
Broad period: NINETEENTH CENTURY
County: Kent
Workflow stage: Published Find published
Three cylindrical glass bottles. The two larger bottles are full size wine bottles. One is of the 'Burgundy' type and is most likely Continental. The half-size wine bottle, originally thought to be a champagne bottle, also has a Continental style neck. The Continental style neck appears around the middle of the 19th century (Dumbrell 1983). All are of nineteenth or twentieth century type.
Created on: Friday 11th August 2017
Last updated: Wednesday 6th December 2017
Spatial data recorded.


  • Thumbnail image of MAS-D100101

Record ID: MAS-D100101
Object type: BOTTLE
Broad period: NINETEENTH CENTURY
County: Kent
Workflow stage: Published Find published
Two case gin bottles. Some of the earliest liquor bottles were square in cross section and generally designed to contain gin though undoubtedly contained various types of liquor and possibly wine. Commonly called 'case gin' or 'taper gin' bottles since they would pack more efficiently in a case (6 to 24 bottles) than round bottles. Case gin bottles are square with a distinct taper inwards from the shoulder to the base. The neck is very short to almost non-existent with the finishes varying from a laid-on ring, flared, mineral finish, oil, and even a blob. This shape and style of bottl…
Created on: Friday 11th August 2017
Last updated: Tuesday 22nd May 2018
Spatial data recorded.


  • Thumbnail image of MAS-D100082

Record ID: MAS-D100082
Object type: BOTTLE
Broad period: NINETEENTH CENTURY
County: Kent
Workflow stage: Published Find published
A collection of four stoneware ginger beer bottles covered with a feldpathic glaze and stamped with 'A Phillips Victoria VI'. These bottles relate to Alexander Phillips of Vancouver Island, British Columbia, whose business ran from 1858. In 1879, his son became a partner in the business after which time the bottles are stamped 'A Phillips & Son' (B.C. & Vancouver Island - Bottles, Antiques & Collectibles, accessed November 2017). These stoneware ginger beer bottles were produced in Britain by the Doulton Lambeth Company. 'VI' stood for the crown colony of Vancouver Island. …
Created on: Friday 11th August 2017
Last updated: Wednesday 6th December 2017
Spatial data recorded.


  • Thumbnail image of MAS-D100100

Record ID: MAS-D100100
Object type: BOTTLE
Broad period: NINETEENTH CENTURY
County: Kent
Workflow stage: Published Find published
A collection of five bottles comprising two full-size glass bottles, one squat cylindrical glass bottle, one small clear bottle, and one stoneware bottle. All the bottles are believed to be of nineteenth and twentieth century type, although it is difficult to date all but the stoneware bottle. The two full-size glass bottles are thought to be either wine or beer bottles. If the bottles have kicked bases, it would indicate a wine bottle, while a flat base would indicate a beer bottle. The squat cylindrical glass bottle was thought to be a port bottle, however if the base is flat, thi…
Created on: Friday 11th August 2017
Last updated: Tuesday 22nd May 2018
Spatial data recorded.


  • Thumbnail image of MAS-D100071

Record ID: MAS-D100071
Object type: BOTTLE
Broad period: NINETEENTH CENTURY
County: Kent
Workflow stage: Published Find published
Three aqua coloured glass bottles with tooled lips; for foodstuffs or other household goods; probably dating to the 19th century. These bottles have a double ring also known as a double collar, double bead, double lip, Davis-type, stacked ring, bead lip with a ring, round band lower flared, broad round collar with lower bevel, inverted double ring, citrate of magnesia finish, double roll collar and stacked ring. This two-part finish is composed of two connected 'rings' - usually with a thicker and slightly wider variably rounded ring at the top of the finish with a thinner and narrowe…
Created on: Monday 24th July 2017
Last updated: Thursday 5th October 2017
Spatial data recorded.


  • Thumbnail image of MAS-D100072

Record ID: MAS-D100072
Object type: BOTTLE
Broad period: NINETEENTH CENTURY
County: Kent
Workflow stage: Published Find published
One Hamilton bottle also known as a torpedo or egg bottle. These bottles are named after their English inventor, William Francis Hamilton who took out a patent in 1809 for a method of bottling soda and other mineral waters, involving ovate bottles (although use of ovate bottle probably pre-dated his patent by at least 20 years). These bottles became common in the 1840s when the manufacturing of mineral water became very popular. Before this date, carbonated water was only sold on a small scale. The bottle was invented as a way of keeping the gas in fizzy drinks. The pointed base meant …
Created on: Monday 24th July 2017
Last updated: Thursday 5th October 2017
Spatial data recorded.


  • Thumbnail image of MAS-D100065

Record ID: MAS-D100065
Object type: BOTTLE
Broad period: NINETEENTH CENTURY
County: Kent
Workflow stage: Published Find published
Six stoneware seltzer bottles, of a type used to carry mineral water from various Continental (mainly German) spas. The term 'seltzer' takes its name from the town of Selters in the lower Rhineland, one of the original producers of effervescent mineral waters. This cylindrical bottle type was used from the early 19th century through to the First World War. These types of bottles were produced by the specialist potters known as Krugbacker, or pot bakers, in the Westerwald region of Germany. These bottles, which changed little throughout the 19th century, were slender and cylindrical and…
Created on: Monday 24th July 2017
Last updated: Thursday 5th October 2017
Spatial data recorded.


  • Thumbnail image of MAS-D100066

Record ID: MAS-D100066
Object type: BOTTLE
Broad period: NINETEENTH CENTURY
County: Kent
Workflow stage: Published Find published
Four stoneware bottles (three large and one smaller) that were probably used for beer, ale, stout or porter. Stoneware bottles provided the ultimate in protection from the detrimental effects of light but were very heavy. They were produced in Britain in the 1800s and many bottles found in the United States were even imported from here. All of these bottles have a feldspathic glaze over an ochre dip on the upper parts of the bottle giving them a darker colour on top. Feldspars (natural rocks of aluminosilicates) are used in stoneware and porcelain glazes because they fuse only at hi…
Created on: Monday 24th July 2017
Last updated: Thursday 5th October 2017
Spatial data recorded.


  • Thumbnail image of MAS-D100063

Record ID: MAS-D100063
Object type: BOTTLE
Broad period: NINETEENTH CENTURY
County: Kent
Workflow stage: Published Find published
Five olive green case gin bottles with a square tapered body and four dots on base. Some of the earliest spirit bottles were square in cross section and generally designed to contain gin, though undoubtedly contained various types of alcohol and possibly wine. Commonly called "case gin" or "taper gin" bottles since they would pack more efficiently to a case (six to 24 bottles) than round bottles. Case gin bottles are square with a more or less distinct taper inwards from the shoulder to the base. The neck is very short to almost non-existent with the finishes varying from a laid-on ri…
Created on: Saturday 15th July 2017
Last updated: Monday 30th March 2020
Spatial data recorded.


  • Thumbnail image of MAS-D100045

Record ID: MAS-D100045
Object type: BOTTLE
Broad period: POST MEDIEVAL
County: Dorset
Workflow stage: Published Find published
Base of a broken glass onion bottle found loose on the seabed with quite a lot of marine growth present, including over the broken edges. Found on Marl Beds - not long after passing over an area of numerous fairly amorphous concretions apparently loose on the coarse sandy seabed.
Created on: Tuesday 30th May 2017
Last updated: Friday 28th February 2020
Spatial data recorded.


  • Thumbnail image of MAS-O100053

Record ID: MAS-O100053
Object type: BOTTLE
Broad period: POST MEDIEVAL
County: Kent
Workflow stage: Published Find published
One gin bottle measuring 11 inches high by 3 1/2 inches wide. This square, mould-blown 'case bottle', has the typical tapering profile. The square shape enabled the bottles to be packed more efficiently in a case than round bottles, and the tapering profile stops them from sticking when removed from the case. They were used for gin (although undoubtedly also sometimes for other spirits or wine). Square case bottles were made in Europe from the middle of the 17th century, but the tapering form seems to have become more common in the 19th century. From the 1880s the bottles were machine …
Created on: Monday 29th May 2017
Last updated: Monday 19th March 2018
Spatial data recorded.


  • Thumbnail image of MAS-D100040

Record ID: MAS-D100040
Object type: BOTTLE
Broad period: POST MEDIEVAL
Workflow stage: Published Find published
One onion bottle dated to c.1700. Glass onion bottles were large hand-blown glass bottles, used aboard sailing ships to hold wine or brandy. For increased stability on rough seas, the bottles were fashioned with a wide-bottom shape to prevent toppling. Between c.1690 and c.1720 the outline of a wine bottle resembled an onion - a wide compressed globular body and a short neck (Robinson and Harding 2015). Most bottles before 1700 had a ring of glass just below the neck that gave anchorage to the string used to hold in variety of stoppers. The Dutch bottles usually had a longer neck than…
Created on: Tuesday 23rd May 2017
Last updated: Wednesday 4th October 2017
No spatial data available.


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