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    • Period from: NINETEENTH CENTURY
    • Broad period: NINETEENTH CENTURY
    • Sort: objectType

  • Thumbnail image of MAS-D100068

Record ID: MAS-D100068
Object type: WINE BOTTLE
Broad period: NINETEENTH CENTURY
County: Kent
Workflow stage: Published Find published
Two green glass wine bottles that appear to have the flat band-like collar around the rim which is typical of Continental (particularly French) wine bottles; the type appeared around the middle of the 19th century. This particular shape was - and still is - referred to as a 'hock' or Rhine wine and was one of the three dominant styles of wine bottles that bridge the time from at least the mid-19th century to the present day. Hock wine bottles are of German or French origin and during the 19th century, typically contained both red and white Rhine and Mosel wines. The distinctive shape…
Created on: Monday 24th July 2017
Last updated: Thursday 5th October 2017
Spatial data recorded.


  • Thumbnail image of MAS-D100228

Record ID: MAS-D100228
Object type: VALVE
Broad period: NINETEENTH CENTURY
County: Kent
Workflow stage: Published Find published
This copper alloy valve has a spherical central body with three sperate connections. One of the connections has a 25 mm long male thread evident, whilst the remaining two are concealed by concretion. One of the connections is probably a female thread entry and the third of the connections an elbow pipe union. The diameter of the connections is approximately 30 mm. Overall dimensions are approximately 100 mm by 100 mm. The exact purpose of such a valve is not immediately apparent, though it likely relates to the vessels' operation and machinery rather than any cargo. As a coal powered …
Created on: Tuesday 25th September 2018
Last updated: Thursday 26th March 2020
Spatial data recorded.


  • Thumbnail image of MAS-D100233

Record ID: MAS-D100233
Object type: UNIDENTIFIED OBJECT
Broad period: NINETEENTH CENTURY
County: Kent
Workflow stage: Published Find published
This find appears to be some form of decorative finial manufactured from a non-ferrous metal, possibly a copper alloy. It measures approximately 356 mm in length, 102 mm in width at the base and 127 mm in width at the widest point just below the top of the object. The base appears to be damaged, though clearly separates into three possible legs or feet. Approximately 76 mm from the base it seems to narrow slightly, possibly due to bearing a ring decoration, though this is difficult to ascertain due to the level of encrustation on the object. The shaft of the item extends for a further …
Created on: Wednesday 10th October 2018
Last updated: Thursday 26th March 2020
Spatial data recorded.


  • Thumbnail image of MAS-D100146

Record ID: MAS-D100146
Object type: UNIDENTIFIED OBJECT
Broad period: NINETEENTH CENTURY
County: Kent
Workflow stage: Published Find published
Find consists of an ornate metal piece, bearing a flyr de lys type of design above a solid bar, presumably used for mounting. No dimensions were given, though it is suggested to be made from lead and H shaped, the finder described it as "part of a fireguard from the ship room". This material type would seem unsuitable for such a purpose, therefore it is still unclear what the purpose of this object is, although it is generally accepted that it is a decorative object of some sort.
Created on: Wednesday 2nd May 2018
Last updated: Thursday 26th March 2020
Spatial data recorded.


  • Thumbnail image of MAS-F100105

Record ID: MAS-F100105
Object type: STRUCTURAL TIMBER
Broad period: NINETEENTH CENTURY
County: East Sussex
Workflow stage: Published Find published
These two unidentified timbers measure 790 x 75 x 90 mm and 160 x 100 x 60 mm and were recovered from a boat's trawl nets whilst working out of Newhaven, East Sussex. The small piece shows evidence of a longer period of immersion in terms of abrasion and marine borer damage, though this may also be due to the relative hardness and variety of the two woods, or any treatment that might have been received to protect the timber. Neither timber appears to be of ship related origin, with the larger darker piece looking as if it might have been a post and rail fence board originally, rather t…
Created on: Wednesday 23rd August 2017
Last updated: Tuesday 22nd May 2018
Spatial data recorded.


  • Thumbnail image of MAS-D100175

Record ID: MAS-D100175
Object type: SHIP FITTINGS
Broad period: NINETEENTH CENTURY
County: Kent
Workflow stage: Published Find published
Two brass deck water filler plates and one ceramic door number (45). The water filler plates are 150 mm in diameter and approximately 100 mm thick. They are both heavily degraded and concreted, distorting their 'mushroom-shaped' original form. It appears they have screws running through the wider top surface and hanging down below next to the tinner plug interior. The screws are approximately 50 mm long and 5 mm in diameter. This type of ships fiitting is used to provide an access point by which to fill water tanks on a vessel and are common on many vessels, from pleasure craft to com…
Created on: Wednesday 9th May 2018
Last updated: Thursday 26th March 2020
Spatial data recorded.


  • Thumbnail image of MAS-D100076

Record ID: MAS-D100076
Object type: ROUNDED BOWL
Broad period: NINETEENTH CENTURY
County: Kent
Workflow stage: Published Find published
Six small convex bowls that may have also functioned as cups or tea bowls. All the bowls are made of a refined whiteware and three of them display a hand painted decoration.The term 'whiteware' is used in historical archaeology to denote refined ceramics with a whiter and denser body than pearlware that generally postdates c.1830. Whiteware is a class of ceramic products that include porcelain and china. They are usually, but not necessarily, white and consist typically of clays, feldspar, potter's flint, and whiting (calcium carbonate). It is thought that these examples may be tea war…
Created on: Monday 24th July 2017
Last updated: Thursday 5th October 2017
Spatial data recorded.


  • Thumbnail image of MAS-D100192

Record ID: MAS-D100192
Object type: PERSONAL ACCESSORY
Broad period: NINETEENTH CENTURY
County: Kent
Workflow stage: Published Find published
One gold T piece to believe part of a watch chain. These pieces were used to fasten the watch chain to an item of clothing, most often a wasitcoat. The T piece has a rounded embossing in the centre of the strip, with a small ring attached at this point for attaching the piece to a chain. The right end of the piece has a single ringed pattern shortly before terminating in a straight clean end. The left side of the piece has steps from the thicker piece to a thinner section extruding out a short distance. Given the date of sinking of the vessel from which it was recovered this item can r…
Created on: Thursday 21st June 2018
Last updated: Thursday 26th March 2020
Spatial data recorded.


  • Thumbnail image of MAS-D100080

Record ID: MAS-D100080
Object type: PERFUME BOTTLE
Broad period: NINETEENTH CENTURY
County: Kent
Workflow stage: Published Find published
Two clear glass perfume bottles. One has a square tapered body and measures 85 mm by 35 mm while the other measures 95 mm by 40 mm and has a round body complete with a round stopper and still contains yellow liquid. Perfume bottles were part of the vessel's cargo and many other bottles have been salvaged from the wreck by divers during recent years. Their form would be entirely consistent with a date around the turn of the 19th/20th century.
Created on: Saturday 15th July 2017
Last updated: Monday 30th March 2020
Spatial data recorded.


  • Thumbnail image of MAS-F100106

Record ID: MAS-F100106
Object type: LADDER
Broad period: NINETEENTH CENTURY
County: East Sussex
Workflow stage: Published Find published
These two timbers are two components of a companion ladder. The larger piece measures 1.14 m long by 0.15 m wide and based on the visible ridges to accommodate the stairs, would have been the left-hand side banister of the ladder. The smaller piece measures 0.56 m wide and is 20 mm thick. This piece is one of the stairs that would have fitted between both banisters and still slots in to one of the grooves on the remaining banister. The join is step and groove radiused rather than square cut. Companion ladders or a companion way is usually steep but has treads or stairs rather than run…
Created on: Wednesday 23rd August 2017
Last updated: Tuesday 8th May 2018
Spatial data recorded.


  • Thumbnail image of MAS-D100054

Record ID: MAS-D100054
Object type: JUG
Broad period: NINETEENTH CENTURY
County: Kent
Workflow stage: Published Find published
Four milk jugs with a Chinese style design and a light grey coloured pattern and appear to be made of porcelain (although this has not been confirmed). Similar in decorative style to the bowls recorded as MAS-D100047, it is assumed that the these milk jugs were made by either Charles Meigh of Hanley, Staffordshire (1835-49), the preceding company, J. Meigh and Son (c.1805-34), or the succeeding company, Charles Meigh and Son (1851-61) (Godden 1964, 428-429).
Created on: Sunday 4th June 2017
Last updated: Tuesday 26th September 2017
Spatial data recorded.


  • Thumbnail image of MAS-D100046

Record ID: MAS-D100046
Object type: JAR
Broad period: NINETEENTH CENTURY
County: Kent
Workflow stage: Published Find published
Two stoneware jars with feldspathic glaze over yellow ochre dip on upper part of vessels. One carries the stamped mark of the manufacturer: 'Doulton & Watts' Lambeth Pottery'. The firm of Doulton and Watts was established in 1820 as Watts and Doulton, becoming Doulton and Watts by 1826 (Tyler et al. 2005, 12). This particular stamp was used until 1858, when John Watts died, after which the name Doulton appeared alone (Eyles and Irvine 2002, Appendix II), although the company name of Doulton and Watts was used in trade catalogues until at least 1873. Feldspathic glazes were introduc…
Created on: Saturday 3rd June 2017
Last updated: Tuesday 26th September 2017
Spatial data recorded.


  • Thumbnail image of MAS-D100074

Record ID: MAS-D100074
Object type: INK BOTTLE
Broad period: NINETEENTH CENTURY
County: Kent
Workflow stage: Published Find published
A collection of four ink bottles; one large and three small. The larger stoneware ink bottle displays a pourer on the rim and is glazed with a feldspathic glaze. This type of ink bottle was introduced in the 1860s and were superseded by glass bottles by the first decade of the 20th century. Cylindrical stoneware ink bottles were made in England in large quantities throughout the Victorian era. The bottles varied widely in size and were not all brown. The larger or master bottles with a pouring lip brown bottles were commonly used for ink. The pouring spout would be used to distribute …
Created on: Monday 24th July 2017
Last updated: Tuesday 21st November 2017
Spatial data recorded.


  • Thumbnail image of MAS-D100232

Record ID: MAS-D100232
Object type: INK BOTTLE
Broad period: NINETEENTH CENTURY
County: Kent
Workflow stage: Published Find published
Four small stoneware cylindrical ceramic inkwells. The ceramic is made of a light brown paste with a salt-glazed surface. The dimensions are 45 mm in diameter by 50 mm high. This type of inkwell was commonly known as a "penny ink" bottle. They were corked, sealed with sealing wax and cost a penny each. They contained writing ink. This type of ink bottle was introduced in the mid-19th century and were superseded by glass bottles by the first decade of the 20th century. Small ink bottles or wells were usually no more than four inches high and did not have a pouring spout like the maste…
Created on: Tuesday 2nd October 2018
Last updated: Thursday 26th March 2020
Spatial data recorded.


  • Thumbnail image of MAS-D100132

Record ID: MAS-D100132
Object type: INK BOTTLE
Broad period: NINETEENTH CENTURY
Workflow stage: Published Find published
One stoneware ink bottle. Ink bottles or inkwells were made of various materials including glass, various metals, various stones, various woods, horn, ceramics and stoneware, and even hard rubber. Prior to beginning of the 19th century, virtually all ink came in ceramic containers which were still commonly used throughout most of the 19th century. Stoneware bottles were superseded by glass bottles by the first decade of the 20th century. Ink bottles of this size are known as the bulk or master ink bottles (https://sha.org/bottle/household.htm, accessed March 2020). The master bottles …
Created on: Monday 23rd October 2017
Last updated: Monday 30th March 2020
No spatial data available.


  • Thumbnail image of MAS-D100128

Record ID: MAS-D100128
Object type: HINGE
Broad period: NINETEENTH CENTURY
Workflow stage: Published Find published
This record refers to the metal hinge and attached timber shown in the top left corner of image one, the other finds are dealt with under separate records. The object is approximately 305 mm in overall length and 204 mm in overall width. For the hinge element of the object only one leaf can be observed from the photo, which measures approximately 64 mm by 127 mm. Given the leaves are likely to be identical in size, this would suggest the overall width is approximately 127 mm making a regular square when fully opened. The metal of the hinge is in generally good condition, with some blu…
Created on: Monday 9th October 2017
Last updated: Wednesday 22nd April 2020
No spatial data available.


  • Thumbnail image of MAS-6105BA

Record ID: MAS-6105BA
Object type: FIREARM
Broad period: NINETEENTH CENTURY
County: Cornwall
Workflow stage: Published Find published
This gun is a QF (quick firing) 6-pounder Hotchkiss, a light 2.25 inch (57 mm) naval and coastal defence gun from the late 19th century. The design appears to be pre-1890 as it does not have the recoil system that was introduced at that time. The original 1885 Mk I was a built-up gun with a vertical sliding-block breech. The name comes from the French manufacturing company, Hotchkiss, who were the major supplier of light QF guns in the world. This type of gun became a standard torpedo defence weapon; many navies bought this same type of gun (Friedman 2011).
Created on: Monday 25th July 2016
Last updated: Friday 26th August 2016
Spatial data recorded.


  • Thumbnail image of MAS-D100193

Record ID: MAS-D100193
Object type: ENGINE
Broad period: NINETEENTH CENTURY
County: East Sussex
Workflow stage: Published Find published
Unidentified non-ferrous object that probably represents part of a ships engine or fixtures and fittings. It appears constructed from a copper alloy, measuring approximately 114 mm by 102 mm, being 52 mm in thickness. The open face of the item exhibits a circular central lug or axle measuring c. 38 mm in diameter, which extends c. 25 mm from the solid rear face. The open face bears a circular aperture, comprising approximately 270 degrees, which flairs out towards the outer edges of the object meeting the top left hand corner on the left side and meeting the edge on the right hand side…
Created on: Thursday 21st June 2018
Last updated: Thursday 26th March 2020
Spatial data recorded.


  • Thumbnail image of MAS-D100078

Record ID: MAS-D100078
Object type: EGG CUP
Broad period: NINETEENTH CENTURY
County: Kent
Workflow stage: Published Find published
One egg cup made of a refined whiteware.The term 'whiteware' is used in historical archaeology to denote refined ceramics with a whiter and denser body than pearlware that generally postdates c.1830. Whiteware is a class of ceramic products that include porcelain and china. They are usually, but not necessarily white and consist typically of clays, feldspar, potter's flint, and whiting (calcium carbonate). It is not until the Victorian era that eggcups were mass marketed and regularly offered with dinnerware services. Companies, like Wedgwood and Haviland, produced eggcups and decorate…
Created on: Monday 24th July 2017
Last updated: Tuesday 29th January 2019
Spatial data recorded.


  • Thumbnail image of MAS-D100087

Record ID: MAS-D100087
Object type: DOMED LID
Broad period: NINETEENTH CENTURY
County: Kent
Workflow stage: Published Find published
One ceramic serving dish lid made of a refined whiteware with transfer-printed design in red.The term 'whiteware' is used in historical archaeology to denote refined ceramics with a whiter and denser body than pearlware that generally postdates c. 1830. Whiteware is a class of ceramic products that include porcelain and china. They are usually, but not necessarily white and consist typically of clays, feldspar, potter's flint, and whiting (calcium carbonate).
Created on: Friday 11th August 2017
Last updated: Wednesday 6th December 2017
Spatial data recorded.


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