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    • Period to: NINETEENTH CENTURY
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  • Thumbnail image of MAS-D100071

Record ID: MAS-D100071
Object type: BOTTLE
Broad period: NINETEENTH CENTURY
County: Kent
Workflow stage: Published Find published
Three aqua coloured glass bottles with tooled lips; for foodstuffs or other household goods; probably dating to the 19th century. These bottles have a double ring also known as a double collar, double bead, double lip, Davis-type, stacked ring, bead lip with a ring, round band lower flared, broad round collar with lower bevel, inverted double ring, citrate of magnesia finish, double roll collar and stacked ring. This two-part finish is composed of two connected 'rings' - usually with a thicker and slightly wider variably rounded ring at the top of the finish with a thinner and narrowe…
Created on: Monday 24th July 2017
Last updated: Thursday 5th October 2017
Spatial data recorded.


  • Thumbnail image of MAS-D100072

Record ID: MAS-D100072
Object type: BOTTLE
Broad period: NINETEENTH CENTURY
County: Kent
Workflow stage: Published Find published
One Hamilton bottle also known as a torpedo or egg bottle. These bottles are named after their English inventor, William Francis Hamilton who took out a patent in 1809 for a method of bottling soda and other mineral waters, involving ovate bottles (although use of ovate bottle probably pre-dated his patent by at least 20 years). These bottles became common in the 1840s when the manufacturing of mineral water became very popular. Before this date, carbonated water was only sold on a small scale. The bottle was invented as a way of keeping the gas in fizzy drinks. The pointed base meant …
Created on: Monday 24th July 2017
Last updated: Thursday 5th October 2017
Spatial data recorded.


  • Thumbnail image of MAS-D100047

Record ID: MAS-D100047
Object type: BOWL
Broad period: NINETEENTH CENTURY
County: Kent
Workflow stage: Published Find published
Seven Chinese style bowls most likely to be made of porcelain. There is a parallel for the base mark that looks as though it's imitating Chinese porcelain marks. This is the mark of Charles Meigh of Hanley, Staffordshire, operating between 1835-49, but it was also used by the preceding company, J. Meigh and Son (c.1805-34) and the succeeding company, Charles Meigh and Son (1851-61) (Godden 1964, 428-429). The CM mark in the '..CASTER' stamp suggests that it's Charles Meigh, which puts the date just before the wreck date.
Created on: Saturday 3rd June 2017
Last updated: Tuesday 26th September 2017
Spatial data recorded.


  • Thumbnail image of MAS-D100054

Record ID: MAS-D100054
Object type: JUG
Broad period: NINETEENTH CENTURY
County: Kent
Workflow stage: Published Find published
Four milk jugs with a Chinese style design and a light grey coloured pattern and appear to be made of porcelain (although this has not been confirmed). Similar in decorative style to the bowls recorded as MAS-D100047, it is assumed that the these milk jugs were made by either Charles Meigh of Hanley, Staffordshire (1835-49), the preceding company, J. Meigh and Son (c.1805-34), or the succeeding company, Charles Meigh and Son (1851-61) (Godden 1964, 428-429).
Created on: Sunday 4th June 2017
Last updated: Tuesday 26th September 2017
Spatial data recorded.


  • Thumbnail image of MAS-D100048

Record ID: MAS-D100048
Object type: CUP
Broad period: NINETEENTH CENTURY
County: Kent
Workflow stage: Published Find published
Eleven teacups measuring 4 inches x 3 inches in size. The cups have a Chinese style design with a light grey colour pattern, and appear to be made of porcelain (although this has not been confirmed). Similar in decorative style to the bowls recorded as MAS-D100047, it is assumed that these teacups were made by either Charles Meigh of Hanley, Staffordshire (1835-49), the preceding company, J. Meigh and Son (c.1805-34), or the succeeding company, Charles Meigh and Son (1851-61) (Godden 1964, 428-429).
Created on: Sunday 4th June 2017
Last updated: Tuesday 26th September 2017
Spatial data recorded.


  • Thumbnail image of MAS-D100049

Record ID: MAS-D100049
Object type: WATER CRAFT EQUIPMENT
Broad period: POST MEDIEVAL
Workflow stage: Published Find published
Two circular wooden pulley sheaves. It is not clear whether these wooden pulley sheaves were a pair or from single sheave pulleys. Generally made from ash (Fraxinus), hickory (Carya) in the case of North America, or Lignum vitae. Lignum vitae, Latin for 'wood of life', is a trade wood, also called Guayacan or Guaiacum from the trees of the genus Guaiacum. The trees are indigenous to the Caribbean and the northern coast of South America and have been an important export crop to Europe since the beginning of the 16th century due to its extraordinary combination of strength, toughness, an…
Created on: Tuesday 14th March 2017
Last updated: Tuesday 26th September 2017
No spatial data available.


  • Thumbnail image of MAS-D100051

Record ID: MAS-D100051
Object type: DRINKING VESSEL
Broad period: POST MEDIEVAL
County: Kent
Workflow stage: Published Find published
One ivy leaf patterned teacup marked with the Davenport logo. This transfer printed refined ware (either pearlware or whiteware) cup dates to the 19th century. John Davenport acquired his own pottery in 1794, initially producing cream coloured blue-printed earthernware. Within 12 years the company's reputation and the quality of its porcelain was such that the future King George IV was ordering services from the company. John Davenport retired in 1830 and the company was continued to be run by his sons and their children until 1887 when the factory closed and the company was acquired b…
Created on: Sunday 21st May 2017
Last updated: Tuesday 26th September 2017
Spatial data recorded.


  • Thumbnail image of MAS-D100050

Record ID: MAS-D100050
Object type: ARCHITECTURAL FRAGMENT
Broad period: POST MEDIEVAL
Workflow stage: Published Find published
A rough cut square marble tile with pink colouration and marine growth visible. The tile measures approximately 0.3 m in length. It has not been possible to provide furter identification at this time.
Created on: Tuesday 14th March 2017
Last updated: Tuesday 26th September 2017
No spatial data available.


  • Thumbnail image of MAS-D100046

Record ID: MAS-D100046
Object type: JAR
Broad period: NINETEENTH CENTURY
County: Kent
Workflow stage: Published Find published
Two stoneware jars with feldspathic glaze over yellow ochre dip on upper part of vessels. One carries the stamped mark of the manufacturer: 'Doulton & Watts' Lambeth Pottery'. The firm of Doulton and Watts was established in 1820 as Watts and Doulton, becoming Doulton and Watts by 1826 (Tyler et al. 2005, 12). This particular stamp was used until 1858, when John Watts died, after which the name Doulton appeared alone (Eyles and Irvine 2002, Appendix II), although the company name of Doulton and Watts was used in trade catalogues until at least 1873. Feldspathic glazes were introduc…
Created on: Saturday 3rd June 2017
Last updated: Tuesday 26th September 2017
Spatial data recorded.


  • Thumbnail image of MAS-D100039

Record ID: MAS-D100039
Object type: CANDLESTICK
Broad period: NINETEENTH CENTURY
County: Kent
Workflow stage: Published Find published
Two mass produced glass candlesticks; one blue and one green that is badly damaged presumably having spent at least a century underwater. No further information is known about them at this time.
Created on: Monday 22nd May 2017
Last updated: Tuesday 26th September 2017
Spatial data recorded.


  • Thumbnail image of MAS-O100041

Record ID: MAS-O100041
Object type: CANDLESTICK
Broad period: NINETEENTH CENTURY
County: Kent
Workflow stage: Published Find published
One green glass candlestick measuring 5.5 inches high and 3.5 inches wide. This candlestick is thought to date to the 19th century.
Created on: Monday 29th May 2017
Last updated: Tuesday 26th September 2017
Spatial data recorded.


  • Thumbnail image of MAS-D100038

Record ID: MAS-D100038
Object type: BOTTLE
Broad period: POST MEDIEVAL
County: Kent
Workflow stage: Published Find published
Four glass bottles that are all square, mould-blown 'case bottles', with a typical tapering profile. The square shape enabled them to be packed more efficiently in a case than round bottles, and the tapering profile stopped them from sticking when removed from the case. These were used for gin (although undoubtedly also sometimes for other spirits or wine). Square case bottles were made in Europe from the middle of the 17th century, but the tapering form seems to have become more common in the 19th century. From the 1880s the bottles were machine made, and the rims properly finished - …
Created on: Sunday 21st May 2017
Last updated: Tuesday 26th September 2017
Spatial data recorded.


  • Thumbnail image of MAS-D100032

Record ID: MAS-D100032
Object type: WATER CRAFT EQUIPMENT
Broad period: POST MEDIEVAL
Workflow stage: Published Find published
A wooden belaying pin, approximately 0.4 m in length. Belaying pins are either solid metal or wooden objects used on sailing ships to secure the running rigging. They are still seen today on traditional square rigged ships and replica vessels. More modern sailing vessels have tended to replace them with fixed cleats. Their design has little changed, comprising a rounded handle and cylindrical shaft of varying length and thickness, dependant on the workload placed on it. The shaft would fit into holes in pinrails, which lined the inside of the bulwarks around the base of the ship's mas…
Created on: Tuesday 14th March 2017
Last updated: Tuesday 26th September 2017
No spatial data available.


  • Thumbnail image of MAS-100009

Record ID: MAS-100009
Object type: SHOT
Broad period: POST MEDIEVAL
County: Essex
Workflow stage: Published Find published
This is an assemblage of six round cast iron and stone projectiles of varying sizes. Due to the ubiquitous nature of their design, it is difficult to accurately date cannonballs with any certainty. This issue is compounded by the wide variation in designs and calibres of the cannons that fired them and the lifespan of the weapon, with obsolete designs often still in use on merchant ships long after they had fallen out of service with the various navies of Northern Europe, who also used captured weapons on their vessels. Cast iron cannonballs are thought to have appeared at some point d…
Created on: Wednesday 28th September 2016
Last updated: Thursday 13th April 2017
Spatial data recorded.


  • Thumbnail image of MAS-D100082

Record ID: MAS-D100082
Object type: BOTTLE
Broad period: NINETEENTH CENTURY
County: Kent
Workflow stage: Published Find published
A collection of four stoneware ginger beer bottles covered with a feldpathic glaze and stamped with 'A Phillips Victoria VI'. These bottles relate to Alexander Phillips of Vancouver Island, British Columbia, whose business ran from 1858. In 1879, his son became a partner in the business after which time the bottles are stamped 'A Phillips & Son' (B.C. & Vancouver Island - Bottles, Antiques & Collectibles, accessed November 2017). These stoneware ginger beer bottles were produced in Britain by the Doulton Lambeth Company. 'VI' stood for the crown colony of Vancouver Island. …
Created on: Friday 11th August 2017
Last updated: Wednesday 6th December 2017
Spatial data recorded.


  • Thumbnail image of MAS-O100053

Record ID: MAS-O100053
Object type: BOTTLE
Broad period: POST MEDIEVAL
County: Kent
Workflow stage: Published Find published
One gin bottle measuring 11 inches high by 3 1/2 inches wide. This square, mould-blown 'case bottle', has the typical tapering profile. The square shape enabled the bottles to be packed more efficiently in a case than round bottles, and the tapering profile stops them from sticking when removed from the case. They were used for gin (although undoubtedly also sometimes for other spirits or wine). Square case bottles were made in Europe from the middle of the 17th century, but the tapering form seems to have become more common in the 19th century. From the 1880s the bottles were machine …
Created on: Monday 29th May 2017
Last updated: Monday 19th March 2018
Spatial data recorded.


  • Thumbnail image of MAS-D100101

Record ID: MAS-D100101
Object type: BOTTLE
Broad period: NINETEENTH CENTURY
County: Kent
Workflow stage: Published Find published
Two case gin bottles. Some of the earliest liquor bottles were square in cross section and generally designed to contain gin though undoubtedly contained various types of liquor and possibly wine. Commonly called 'case gin' or 'taper gin' bottles since they would pack more efficiently in a case (6 to 24 bottles) than round bottles. Case gin bottles are square with a distinct taper inwards from the shoulder to the base. The neck is very short to almost non-existent with the finishes varying from a laid-on ring, flared, mineral finish, oil, and even a blob. This shape and style of bottl…
Created on: Friday 11th August 2017
Last updated: Tuesday 22nd May 2018
Spatial data recorded.


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