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  • Thumbnail image of MAS-D100132

Record ID: MAS-D100132
Object type: INK BOTTLE
Broad period: NINETEENTH CENTURY
Workflow stage: Published Find published
One stoneware ink bottle. Ink bottles or inkwells were made of various materials including glass, various metals, various stones, various woods, horn, ceramics and stoneware, and even hard rubber. Prior to beginning of the 19th century, virtually all ink came in ceramic containers which were still commonly used throughout most of the 19th century. Stoneware bottles were superseded by glass bottles by the first decade of the 20th century. Ink bottles of this size are known as the bulk or master ink bottles (https://sha.org/bottle/household.htm, accessed March 2020). The master bottles …
Created on: Monday 23rd October 2017
Last updated: Monday 30th March 2020
No spatial data available.


  • Thumbnail image of MAS-D100134

Record ID: MAS-D100134
Object type: HANDLE
Broad period: POST MEDIEVAL
Workflow stage: Published Find published
The stem of a silver fork or spoon with a hallmark pattern. The set of four hallmarks located together on the piece of cutlery indicates it was made later than 1781, when this practice was first introduced. Based on this image, this type of spoon/fork is possibly a Fiddle pattern - this refers to the shape of the handle - and is a type introduced in the 1780s and still in production today. The Fiddle pattern means that there are shoulders on the stem near the bowl, which is seen on this example. The lower end of the stem juts out around 90 degrees but this example may have been worn d…
Created on: Monday 23rd October 2017
Last updated: Monday 30th March 2020
No spatial data available.


  • Thumbnail image of MAS-D100156

Record ID: MAS-D100156
Object type: BOTTLE
Broad period: NINETEENTH CENTURY
Workflow stage: Published Find published
Three salt glazed stoneware bottles. This form of bottle was a type used to carry seltzer water and gin. Seltzer water was exported by various Continental (mainly German) spas. The term 'seltzer' takes its name from the town of Selters in the lower Rhineland, one of the original producers of effervescent mineral waters. This cylindrical bottle type was used from the early 19th century through to the First World War and were produced by the specialist potters known as Krugbacker, or pot bakers, in the Westerwald region of Germany. These bottles, which changed little throughout the 19t…
Created on: Monday 23rd October 2017
Last updated: Monday 30th March 2020
No spatial data available.


  • Thumbnail image of MAS-D100129

Record ID: MAS-D100129
Object type: BOTTLES
Broad period: POST MEDIEVAL
Workflow stage: Published Find published
Two bottles with dark glass. Both appear to be 250 mm from finish to base and 50 mm in diameter. One bottle is dark green and the other black. Both have been encrusted and marked with biological activity, which could be mistaken for ornate symbols and badges. Neither are corked or stoppered. Both are very similar in style with straight bodies, rounded and slightly abrupt shoulders that lead into slightly bulging necks before an applied wine finish. From this shape and size, both bottles are assumed to be wine bottles, or perhaps liquor bottles from the 19-20th century. The finish of …
Created on: Monday 9th October 2017
Last updated: Friday 27th March 2020
No spatial data available.


  • Thumbnail image of MAS-D100150

Record ID: MAS-D100150
Object type: LID
Broad period: MODERN
Workflow stage: Published Find published
One copper item, thought to be a lid by discoverer. It is around 180 mm in diameter with greenish brown discolouration from the oxidising of the copper. At its centre there is a raised disc that has been possibly beaten out of the original shape. This circular embossed disc is approximately 90 mm in diameter and has a small circular aperture in its centre (roughly 10 mm diameter). Other than a lid, the item could be a lamp shade of some sort or a hub of some wheeled apparatus.
Created on: Monday 9th October 2017
Last updated: Friday 27th March 2020
No spatial data available.


  • Thumbnail image of MAS-D100128

Record ID: MAS-D100128
Object type: HINGE
Broad period: NINETEENTH CENTURY
Workflow stage: Published Find published
This record refers to the metal hinge and attached timber shown in the top left corner of image one, the other finds are dealt with under separate records. The object is approximately 305 mm in overall length and 204 mm in overall width. For the hinge element of the object only one leaf can be observed from the photo, which measures approximately 64 mm by 127 mm. Given the leaves are likely to be identical in size, this would suggest the overall width is approximately 127 mm making a regular square when fully opened. The metal of the hinge is in generally good condition, with some blu…
Created on: Monday 9th October 2017
Last updated: Wednesday 22nd April 2020
No spatial data available.


  • Thumbnail image of MAS-O100124

Record ID: MAS-O100124
Object type: BRASS
Broad period: POST MEDIEVAL
Workflow stage: Published Find published
One ornate brass piece. The piece has an aperture in the middle, in the centre of a circular disc which is itself recessed slightly into the surface. The disc extends laterally into two leaf-shaped limbs, which are decoratively styled and form curved arrows at their tips. At the end of each limb there is a circular hole, which was likely used to fasten the brass piece to its host object. These holes are countersunk, presumably to accommodate the heads of screws. The piece is approximately 90 mm in length, with a width of 40 mm and thickness of 2 mm. The diameter of the two larger holes…
Created on: Monday 11th September 2017
Last updated: Friday 27th March 2020
Spatial data recorded.


  • Thumbnail image of MAS-D100115

Record ID: MAS-D100115
Object type: CARTRIDGE
Broad period: NINETEENTH CENTURY
County: Kent
Workflow stage: Published Find published
Images of this find were sent to Trevor Parker of the Ordnance Society. He confirmed that these three shell cases belong to a six-pounder Hotchkiss gun. This particular type of gun was introduced in 1884 for use against torpedo boats. They were used during First World War on the Arethusa and early 'C' class cruisers and a few submarines as well as on Monitors M.15 through M.33. Originally French in origin, they were introduced to Britain in 1886 (Tucker 2013). Many were subsequently used as sub-calibre and saluting guns which meant that they were still available in 1939 (Naval Weapons,…
Created on: Friday 8th September 2017
Last updated: Thursday 5th October 2017
Spatial data recorded.


  • Thumbnail image of MAS-F100111

Record ID: MAS-F100111
Object type: AIRCRAFT COMPONENT
Broad period: MODERN
County: East Sussex
Workflow stage: Published Find published
Aluminium aircraft section, heavily corroded and damaged. No identifying marks or plates visible, though two cross member plate remnants present. 870 x 45mm. The lack of identifying marks means that the type and origin of the aircraft cannot be definitively identified from this recovered section. Initially thought to be part of a piston engine support frame from something like a Spitfire fighter, a Dakota transport aircraft, or perhaps one of the multi-engined bombers,this theory was discarded as these are generally circular in section. The double row of rivet holes down one side (pre…
Created on: Wednesday 23rd August 2017
Last updated: Wednesday 23rd May 2018
Spatial data recorded.


  • Thumbnail image of MAS-F100110

Record ID: MAS-F100110
Object type: POST
Broad period: POST MEDIEVAL
County: East Sussex
Workflow stage: Published Find published
Heavily eroded and abraded timber fragment with marine borer and growth present. As it is so worn, it is difficult to tell what type of wood it is and whether this fragment was originally completely shaped and worked, or just partially worked to achieve its function. The timber does not exhibit any evidence or staining from fastenings, however, there is one hole that could have been a fastening point at some stage. It is thought that this fragment may be a broken post or groyne timber that has come from a beach rather than material relating to a wreck. Groynes are wooden barriers bui…
Created on: Wednesday 23rd August 2017
Last updated: Tuesday 8th May 2018
Spatial data recorded.


  • Thumbnail image of MAS-F100109

Record ID: MAS-F100109
Object type: BOAT
Broad period: MODERN
County: East Sussex
Workflow stage: Published Find published
This find is an unidentified curved aluminium sheet that measures approximately 0.94 m by 0.24 m and has a thickness of 5 mm. The sheet displays one riveted hole and one area still exhibits faint traces of red paint. The sheet is covered in a layer of marine growth. Initially it was believed that this object could be associated with aviation remains, however, after consulting our historic aircraft specialist, it was confirmed that the material is too thick to belong to an aircraft. The colour red does not often appear, other than on external markings or Luftwaffe radio equipment, both…
Created on: Wednesday 23rd August 2017
Last updated: Tuesday 8th May 2018
Spatial data recorded.


  • Thumbnail image of MAS-F100108

Record ID: MAS-F100108
Object type: PORTHOLE
Broad period: MODERN
County: East Sussex
Workflow stage: Published Find published
This object is the remains of a brass porthole ring measuring 250 mm across with a brass rim 28 mm wide. It is thought that this frame would have been on the outside of the hull of the vessel while an internal frame on the inside of the vessel would have contained the glass element and a hinged deadlight (a metal plate that was both a curtain and a reinforcement against heavy seas). Portholes have been used for centuries to allow light and ventilation to enter the lower, darker levels of vessels and in some early cases, as a means of seeing out of a submersible. Portholes are waterti…
Created on: Wednesday 23rd August 2017
Last updated: Tuesday 8th May 2018
Spatial data recorded.


  • Thumbnail image of MAS-F100107

Record ID: MAS-F100107
Object type: TRANSPORT
Broad period: POST MEDIEVAL
County: East Sussex
Workflow stage: Published Find published
This ship's timber is 830 mm long, 110 x 120 mm in profile, with truncated 25 mm diameter treenails; and a 385 x 65 mm slot for the supporting metal work from which the visible corrosion products suggest that they were of iron construction. The images were forwarded to ship expert and author Richard Endsor. The timber appears to be the beam end from a small ship, with evidence of knees on both sides. The small piece of plank let into it crossways may be the remains of a waterway at the side making this face the upper side of the beam. The treenails probably secured the plank. The notc…
Created on: Wednesday 23rd August 2017
Last updated: Wednesday 23rd May 2018
Spatial data recorded.


  • Thumbnail image of MAS-F100106

Record ID: MAS-F100106
Object type: LADDER
Broad period: NINETEENTH CENTURY
County: East Sussex
Workflow stage: Published Find published
These two timbers are two components of a companion ladder. The larger piece measures 1.14 m long by 0.15 m wide and based on the visible ridges to accommodate the stairs, would have been the left-hand side banister of the ladder. The smaller piece measures 0.56 m wide and is 20 mm thick. This piece is one of the stairs that would have fitted between both banisters and still slots in to one of the grooves on the remaining banister. The join is step and groove radiused rather than square cut. Companion ladders or a companion way is usually steep but has treads or stairs rather than run…
Created on: Wednesday 23rd August 2017
Last updated: Tuesday 8th May 2018
Spatial data recorded.


  • Thumbnail image of MAS-F100105

Record ID: MAS-F100105
Object type: STRUCTURAL TIMBER
Broad period: NINETEENTH CENTURY
County: East Sussex
Workflow stage: Published Find published
These two unidentified timbers measure 790 x 75 x 90 mm and 160 x 100 x 60 mm and were recovered from a boat's trawl nets whilst working out of Newhaven, East Sussex. The small piece shows evidence of a longer period of immersion in terms of abrasion and marine borer damage, though this may also be due to the relative hardness and variety of the two woods, or any treatment that might have been received to protect the timber. Neither timber appears to be of ship related origin, with the larger darker piece looking as if it might have been a post and rail fence board originally, rather t…
Created on: Wednesday 23rd August 2017
Last updated: Tuesday 22nd May 2018
Spatial data recorded.


  • Thumbnail image of MAS-F100104

Record ID: MAS-F100104
Object type: SHELL CASES
Broad period: MODERN
County: East Sussex
Workflow stage: Published Find published
The shell case measures 660 mm long and is 152 mm in diameter at the base, and 116 mm in diameter at the neck though this has been buckled and stretched. The shell case appears to have been either constructed without a base, or it has been removed at some point in the past. The diameter of the neck and its overall size point to it being a 4.5-inch or possibly a 4.7-inch shell case. Without the base with the details of type, manufacturer and date of manufacture, the history and origin of this case is not clear. It would have been part of a fixed round, i.e. the shell was attached to the…
Created on: Wednesday 23rd August 2017
Last updated: Tuesday 8th May 2018
Spatial data recorded.


  • Thumbnail image of MAS-F100103

Record ID: MAS-F100103
Object type: BOTTLE
Broad period: MODERN
County: East Sussex
Workflow stage: Published Find published
This flat-based Hamilton, or 'torpedo' bottle stands 240 mm high, with a 64-mm wide base and is approximately 90 mm wide at the waist. It has a 'bottle logo' embossed on its base. There are possibly other text/numerals that have since worn away. The bottle shows moulding scars on the base and sides. It has a crown top finish. The egg-shaped bottle was first patented by William Francis Hamilton in 1814, the idea being that the bottle had to be stored on its side to keep the cork wet and ensuring a good seal on the reusable bottle. In around 1870, the flat based egg or Hamilton bottle w…
Created on: Wednesday 23rd August 2017
Last updated: Wednesday 23rd May 2018
Spatial data recorded.


  • Thumbnail image of MAS-D100087

Record ID: MAS-D100087
Object type: DOMED LID
Broad period: NINETEENTH CENTURY
County: Kent
Workflow stage: Published Find published
One ceramic serving dish lid made of a refined whiteware with transfer-printed design in red.The term 'whiteware' is used in historical archaeology to denote refined ceramics with a whiter and denser body than pearlware that generally postdates c. 1830. Whiteware is a class of ceramic products that include porcelain and china. They are usually, but not necessarily white and consist typically of clays, feldspar, potter's flint, and whiting (calcium carbonate).
Created on: Friday 11th August 2017
Last updated: Wednesday 6th December 2017
Spatial data recorded.


  • Thumbnail image of MAS-D100084

Record ID: MAS-D100084
Object type: BOTTLE
Broad period: NINETEENTH CENTURY
County: Kent
Workflow stage: Published Find published
Three cylindrical glass bottles. The two larger bottles are full size wine bottles. One is of the 'Burgundy' type and is most likely Continental. The half-size wine bottle, originally thought to be a champagne bottle, also has a Continental style neck. The Continental style neck appears around the middle of the 19th century (Dumbrell 1983). All are of nineteenth or twentieth century type.
Created on: Friday 11th August 2017
Last updated: Wednesday 6th December 2017
Spatial data recorded.


  • Thumbnail image of MAS-D100085

Record ID: MAS-D100085
Object type: CLAY PIPE (SMOKING)
Broad period: NINETEENTH CENTURY
County: Kent
Workflow stage: Published Find published
A selection of seven clay pipes. Two of the pipes are of 'Irish' type (Atkinson and Oswald 1969, type 31, dated post-1840), with spurs and milled bowl rims, and the remaining five are of a spur-less form copying the briar pipe (ibid., type 30, dated c. 1850-1910). All of the clay pipes are 'cutty' (short) pipes. The spur-less examples are all stamped with the mark 'H B W Russell Co.'. This appears to be the mark of an agent or retailer rather than the pipe manufacturer (as is more usual). H. B. W. Russell may have a connection with Liverpool - pipes stamped 'HBW Russell of Liverpool' …
Created on: Friday 11th August 2017
Last updated: Thursday 7th December 2017
Spatial data recorded.


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