Database search results

Back to simple search | Back to advanced search

    You searched for:

    • Period to: NINETEENTH CENTURY
    • Show this many records per page: 20
    • Page: 2

  • Thumbnail image of MAS-O100179

Record ID: MAS-O100179
Object type: ORDNANCE
Broad period: POST MEDIEVAL
County: Dorset
Workflow stage: Published Find published
This find consists of 12 lead balls varying in diameter between c. 15 mm and 21mm. All appear unfired and bear the mould lines and sprue marks from being hand moulded in a 2 part mould. The balls themselves are in fair condition, though some bear concretion/encrustation. Images of the finds were sent to Charles Trollop, an expert in historical ordnance, who advised that in all likelihood these are English Standard Musket (0.775 " or 19.79 mm) and Carbine (0.615 " or 15.64 mm) Balls. These standards relate to most of the black powder/smooth bore period from the 17th to 19th centuries.
Created on: Friday 1st June 2018
Last updated: Thursday 26th March 2020
Spatial data recorded.


  • Thumbnail image of MAS-D100178

Record ID: MAS-D100178
Object type: TOOTHBRUSH
Broad period: POST MEDIEVAL
County: Dorset
Workflow stage: Published Find published
This find consists of a brush handle and head manufactured from either bone, horn or ivory, with the bristles missing. The item is approximately 160 mm in overall length, with the head being c. 60 mm, a neck of c. 20 mm and a handle of 80 mm. The head of the brush is c. 15 mm wide, the neck c. 8mm and the handle c.10 mm. There is a small hole in the end of the handle, presumably for accomodating a lanyard or for hanging the brush from. In the head there are 32 holes for accomodating the bristles, with channels recessed and filled on the rear face where the bristles would have been secu…
Created on: Friday 1st June 2018
Last updated: Thursday 26th March 2020
Spatial data recorded.


  • Thumbnail image of MAS-D100177

Record ID: MAS-D100177
Object type: TIMBER
Broad period: POST MEDIEVAL
County: Dorset
Workflow stage: Published Find published
Section of highly degraded timber measuring approximately 216 mm in length by 31 mm at its widest point. The ends taper to a point, in a regular fashion that seems a deliberate aspect of the timber rather than part of the process of degredation. At least five nail or bolt holes are apparent in the face of the timber, further differentiating the piece from a section of unworked natural wood. The function of the timber is unidentifiable from the data available. As it has been recovered from a wreck it is likely to relate to the vessel itself and can tentatively be interpreted as a ships …
Created on: Friday 1st June 2018
Last updated: Thursday 26th March 2020
Spatial data recorded.


  • Thumbnail image of MAS-D100175

Record ID: MAS-D100175
Object type: SHIP FITTINGS
Broad period: NINETEENTH CENTURY
County: Kent
Workflow stage: Published Find published
Two brass deck water filler plates and one ceramic door number (45). The water filler plates are 150 mm in diameter and approximately 100 mm thick. They are both heavily degraded and concreted, distorting their 'mushroom-shaped' original form. It appears they have screws running through the wider top surface and hanging down below next to the tinner plug interior. The screws are approximately 50 mm long and 5 mm in diameter. This type of ships fiitting is used to provide an access point by which to fill water tanks on a vessel and are common on many vessels, from pleasure craft to com…
Created on: Wednesday 9th May 2018
Last updated: Thursday 26th March 2020
Spatial data recorded.


  • Thumbnail image of MAS-D100174

Record ID: MAS-D100174
Object type: CUTLERY
Broad period: NINETEENTH CENTURY
County: Kent
Workflow stage: Published Find published
This record refers to the handle of a metal spoon or fork included within this group of finds. The diagnostic end of the piece is broken and therefore is uncertain whether this is a fork or spoon, and a lack of measurements precludes determining whether this is a tea or desert size in terms of spoon , or cake or main course size of fork. The fabric of the item, though slightly coroded, has a yellowish colour which may indicate gold or gold plating has been used in its manufacture. Alternatively, given the verdigris colour of the corrosion, may have been constructed in a copper alloy or…
Created on: Wednesday 2nd May 2018
Last updated: Thursday 26th March 2020
Spatial data recorded.


  • Thumbnail image of MAS-D100146

Record ID: MAS-D100146
Object type: UNIDENTIFIED OBJECT
Broad period: NINETEENTH CENTURY
County: Kent
Workflow stage: Published Find published
Find consists of an ornate metal piece, bearing a flyr de lys type of design above a solid bar, presumably used for mounting. No dimensions were given, though it is suggested to be made from lead and H shaped, the finder described it as "part of a fireguard from the ship room". This material type would seem unsuitable for such a purpose, therefore it is still unclear what the purpose of this object is, although it is generally accepted that it is a decorative object of some sort.
Created on: Wednesday 2nd May 2018
Last updated: Thursday 26th March 2020
Spatial data recorded.


  • Thumbnail image of MAS-D100173

Record ID: MAS-D100173
Object type: CLOCK
Broad period: NINETEENTH CENTURY
County: Kent
Workflow stage: Published Find published
This record refers to the clock parts recovered as part of a group of finds. The finder described the items as 6 clock parts, the square glass from the clock face and the copper clock face from a grandfather clock, which suggests these finds represent parts of two separate clocks. Three of the clock parts, manufactured in a copper alloy, are circular and bear teeth around their circumference indicating they are part of the clockwork mechanism. Two other parts, also in copper alloy, are circular but without evidence of teeth. One has three screw holes arranged around a central circular…
Created on: Wednesday 2nd May 2018
Last updated: Thursday 9th April 2020
Spatial data recorded.


  • Thumbnail image of MAS-D100132

Record ID: MAS-D100132
Object type: INK BOTTLE
Broad period: NINETEENTH CENTURY
Workflow stage: Published Find published
One stoneware ink bottle. Ink bottles or inkwells were made of various materials including glass, various metals, various stones, various woods, horn, ceramics and stoneware, and even hard rubber. Prior to beginning of the 19th century, virtually all ink came in ceramic containers which were still commonly used throughout most of the 19th century. Stoneware bottles were superseded by glass bottles by the first decade of the 20th century. Ink bottles of this size are known as the bulk or master ink bottles (https://sha.org/bottle/household.htm, accessed March 2020). The master bottles …
Created on: Monday 23rd October 2017
Last updated: Monday 30th March 2020
No spatial data available.


  • Thumbnail image of MAS-D100101

Record ID: MAS-D100101
Object type: BOTTLE
Broad period: NINETEENTH CENTURY
County: Kent
Workflow stage: Published Find published
Two case gin bottles. Some of the earliest liquor bottles were square in cross section and generally designed to contain gin though undoubtedly contained various types of liquor and possibly wine. Commonly called 'case gin' or 'taper gin' bottles since they would pack more efficiently in a case (6 to 24 bottles) than round bottles. Case gin bottles are square with a distinct taper inwards from the shoulder to the base. The neck is very short to almost non-existent with the finishes varying from a laid-on ring, flared, mineral finish, oil, and even a blob. This shape and style of bottl…
Created on: Friday 11th August 2017
Last updated: Tuesday 22nd May 2018
Spatial data recorded.


  • Thumbnail image of MAS-D100082

Record ID: MAS-D100082
Object type: BOTTLE
Broad period: NINETEENTH CENTURY
County: Kent
Workflow stage: Published Find published
A collection of four stoneware ginger beer bottles covered with a feldpathic glaze and stamped with 'A Phillips Victoria VI'. These bottles relate to Alexander Phillips of Vancouver Island, British Columbia, whose business ran from 1858. In 1879, his son became a partner in the business after which time the bottles are stamped 'A Phillips & Son' (B.C. & Vancouver Island - Bottles, Antiques & Collectibles, accessed November 2017). These stoneware ginger beer bottles were produced in Britain by the Doulton Lambeth Company. 'VI' stood for the crown colony of Vancouver Island. …
Created on: Friday 11th August 2017
Last updated: Wednesday 6th December 2017
Spatial data recorded.


  • Thumbnail image of MAS-D100071

Record ID: MAS-D100071
Object type: BOTTLE
Broad period: NINETEENTH CENTURY
County: Kent
Workflow stage: Published Find published
Three aqua coloured glass bottles with tooled lips; for foodstuffs or other household goods; probably dating to the 19th century. These bottles have a double ring also known as a double collar, double bead, double lip, Davis-type, stacked ring, bead lip with a ring, round band lower flared, broad round collar with lower bevel, inverted double ring, citrate of magnesia finish, double roll collar and stacked ring. This two-part finish is composed of two connected 'rings' - usually with a thicker and slightly wider variably rounded ring at the top of the finish with a thinner and narrowe…
Created on: Monday 24th July 2017
Last updated: Thursday 5th October 2017
Spatial data recorded.


  • Thumbnail image of MAS-D100072

Record ID: MAS-D100072
Object type: BOTTLE
Broad period: NINETEENTH CENTURY
County: Kent
Workflow stage: Published Find published
One Hamilton bottle also known as a torpedo or egg bottle. These bottles are named after their English inventor, William Francis Hamilton who took out a patent in 1809 for a method of bottling soda and other mineral waters, involving ovate bottles (although use of ovate bottle probably pre-dated his patent by at least 20 years). These bottles became common in the 1840s when the manufacturing of mineral water became very popular. Before this date, carbonated water was only sold on a small scale. The bottle was invented as a way of keeping the gas in fizzy drinks. The pointed base meant …
Created on: Monday 24th July 2017
Last updated: Thursday 5th October 2017
Spatial data recorded.


  • Thumbnail image of MAS-D100063

Record ID: MAS-D100063
Object type: BOTTLE
Broad period: NINETEENTH CENTURY
County: Kent
Workflow stage: Published Find published
Five olive green case gin bottles with a square tapered body and four dots on base. Some of the earliest spirit bottles were square in cross section and generally designed to contain gin, though undoubtedly contained various types of alcohol and possibly wine. Commonly called "case gin" or "taper gin" bottles since they would pack more efficiently to a case (six to 24 bottles) than round bottles. Case gin bottles are square with a more or less distinct taper inwards from the shoulder to the base. The neck is very short to almost non-existent with the finishes varying from a laid-on ri…
Created on: Saturday 15th July 2017
Last updated: Monday 30th March 2020
Spatial data recorded.


  • Thumbnail image of MAS-D100054

Record ID: MAS-D100054
Object type: JUG
Broad period: NINETEENTH CENTURY
County: Kent
Workflow stage: Published Find published
Four milk jugs with a Chinese style design and a light grey coloured pattern and appear to be made of porcelain (although this has not been confirmed). Similar in decorative style to the bowls recorded as MAS-D100047, it is assumed that the these milk jugs were made by either Charles Meigh of Hanley, Staffordshire (1835-49), the preceding company, J. Meigh and Son (c.1805-34), or the succeeding company, Charles Meigh and Son (1851-61) (Godden 1964, 428-429).
Created on: Sunday 4th June 2017
Last updated: Tuesday 26th September 2017
Spatial data recorded.


  • Thumbnail image of MAS-D100048

Record ID: MAS-D100048
Object type: CUP
Broad period: NINETEENTH CENTURY
County: Kent
Workflow stage: Published Find published
Eleven teacups measuring 4 inches x 3 inches in size. The cups have a Chinese style design with a light grey colour pattern, and appear to be made of porcelain (although this has not been confirmed). Similar in decorative style to the bowls recorded as MAS-D100047, it is assumed that these teacups were made by either Charles Meigh of Hanley, Staffordshire (1835-49), the preceding company, J. Meigh and Son (c.1805-34), or the succeeding company, Charles Meigh and Son (1851-61) (Godden 1964, 428-429).
Created on: Sunday 4th June 2017
Last updated: Tuesday 26th September 2017
Spatial data recorded.


  • Thumbnail image of MAS-D100047

Record ID: MAS-D100047
Object type: BOWL
Broad period: NINETEENTH CENTURY
County: Kent
Workflow stage: Published Find published
Seven Chinese style bowls most likely to be made of porcelain. There is a parallel for the base mark that looks as though it's imitating Chinese porcelain marks. This is the mark of Charles Meigh of Hanley, Staffordshire, operating between 1835-49, but it was also used by the preceding company, J. Meigh and Son (c.1805-34) and the succeeding company, Charles Meigh and Son (1851-61) (Godden 1964, 428-429). The CM mark in the '..CASTER' stamp suggests that it's Charles Meigh, which puts the date just before the wreck date.
Created on: Saturday 3rd June 2017
Last updated: Tuesday 26th September 2017
Spatial data recorded.


  • Thumbnail image of MAS-D100046

Record ID: MAS-D100046
Object type: JAR
Broad period: NINETEENTH CENTURY
County: Kent
Workflow stage: Published Find published
Two stoneware jars with feldspathic glaze over yellow ochre dip on upper part of vessels. One carries the stamped mark of the manufacturer: 'Doulton & Watts' Lambeth Pottery'. The firm of Doulton and Watts was established in 1820 as Watts and Doulton, becoming Doulton and Watts by 1826 (Tyler et al. 2005, 12). This particular stamp was used until 1858, when John Watts died, after which the name Doulton appeared alone (Eyles and Irvine 2002, Appendix II), although the company name of Doulton and Watts was used in trade catalogues until at least 1873. Feldspathic glazes were introduc…
Created on: Saturday 3rd June 2017
Last updated: Tuesday 26th September 2017
Spatial data recorded.


  • Thumbnail image of MAS-O100041

Record ID: MAS-O100041
Object type: CANDLESTICK
Broad period: NINETEENTH CENTURY
County: Kent
Workflow stage: Published Find published
One green glass candlestick measuring 5.5 inches high and 3.5 inches wide. This candlestick is thought to date to the 19th century.
Created on: Monday 29th May 2017
Last updated: Tuesday 26th September 2017
Spatial data recorded.


  • Thumbnail image of MAS-O100053

Record ID: MAS-O100053
Object type: BOTTLE
Broad period: POST MEDIEVAL
County: Kent
Workflow stage: Published Find published
One gin bottle measuring 11 inches high by 3 1/2 inches wide. This square, mould-blown 'case bottle', has the typical tapering profile. The square shape enabled the bottles to be packed more efficiently in a case than round bottles, and the tapering profile stops them from sticking when removed from the case. They were used for gin (although undoubtedly also sometimes for other spirits or wine). Square case bottles were made in Europe from the middle of the 17th century, but the tapering form seems to have become more common in the 19th century. From the 1880s the bottles were machine …
Created on: Monday 29th May 2017
Last updated: Monday 19th March 2018
Spatial data recorded.


  • Thumbnail image of MAS-D100039

Record ID: MAS-D100039
Object type: CANDLESTICK
Broad period: NINETEENTH CENTURY
County: Kent
Workflow stage: Published Find published
Two mass produced glass candlesticks; one blue and one green that is badly damaged presumably having spent at least a century underwater. No further information is known about them at this time.
Created on: Monday 22nd May 2017
Last updated: Tuesday 26th September 2017
Spatial data recorded.


21 - 40 of 47 records.

Other formats: this page is available as json xml rss atom kml geojson qrcode representations.