Articles about the Scheme and Marine Archaeology in the Guardian

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Wreck of Captain Cook's HMS Endeavour 'discovered' off US coast

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The possible discovery of HMS Endeavour off the east coast of the US has been hailed as a “hugely significant moment” in Australian history, but researchers have warned they are yet to “definitively” confirm whether the wreck has been located. On Wednesday Fairfax Media reported archaeologists from the Rhode Island Marine Archaeology Project, or Rimap, had pinpointed the final resting place of the famous vessel in which Captain James Cook reached Australia in 1770. The ship was later used by the Royal Navy in the American war of independence and was eventually scuttled with a dozen other vessels off Newport, Rhode Island in 1778. Related:

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Tags: Australia news World news US news Article News Michael McGowan The Guardian Main section Top stories Australia News

New technologies bring marine archaeology treasures to light

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No one knows what happened at Atlit-Yam. The ancient village appeared to be thriving until 7000BC. The locals kept cattle, caught fish and stored grain. They had wells for fresh water, stone houses with paved courtyards. Community life played out around an impressive monument: seven half-tonne stones that stood in a semicircular embrace around a spring where people came to drink. Then one day, life ended. The village that once sat on the Mediterranean coast now lies 10 metres beneath the waves off Israel’s shore. It was inundated when sea levels rose at the end of the last ice age. But Atlit-Yam was destroyed before then, and swiftly, perhaps by a tsunami. Buried under sand at the bottom of the sea, it now ranks as the largest and best preserved prehistoric settlement ever found on the seafloor. Human skeletons still lie there in graves, undisturbed.

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Tags: Archaeology Science Technology Internet of things Internet Italy Article News Ian Sample The Guardian Main section UK news UK Science

In resurrecting Captain Cook’s ship, we can re-examine our colonial past

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News has emerged confirming the whereabouts of the wreckage of HMS Endeavour, a ship sailed by Captain James Cook. Reports invariably contain images of the ship in its pomp, proudly reminding the reader of its British origins and its voyage to the Pacific Ocean, where Cook took possession of Australia. But where should Cook’s ship go? Once we dredge it up, or rather, once the Rhode Island Marine Archaeology Project dredges it up, where should it be put? And will Cook’s ship be allowed to take us beyond our colonial past? It must be remembered that it is our cultural attachment that will be doing the dredging, our obsession and fascination with these objects that circulate as evidence of the all-powerful histories of empire…

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Tags: Opinion Colonialism Archaeology Australia news World news Rhode Island Indigenous Australians Science Comment British empire Article Sarah Cefai UK Opinion

Captain Cook's Endeavour: from the Great Barrier Reef to Rhode Island?

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Captain James Cook observed the transit of Venus from the shores of Tahiti, ran aground on the Great Barrier Reef and claimed Australia for the British crown. He fought the French in the Americas, circumnavigated the world and died trying to kidnap a king of Hawaii. Related: Wreckage of Captain James Cook's ship Endeavour found, researchers say But the ship that saw so many adventures was sold, forgotten and lost. For centuries, the fate of HMS Endeavour has remained a mystery. Now marine archaeologists are almost certain they have found its wreck at the bottom of the sea – off exotic Rhode Island.
Researchers with the Rhode Island Marine Archaeology Project (Rimap) will announce on Wednesday that they are nearly sure that they ha…

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Tags: Rhode Island US news Archaeology Science Article News Alan Yuhas The Guardian Main section International US Foreign

Marine archaeologists discover rare artefacts at 1503 shipwreck site

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A British-led archaeological expedition has uncovered the 500-year-old wreck site of what it claims is the earliest ship ever found from Europe’s “Age of Discovery”, a Portuguese vessel that was captained by an uncle of the legendary explorer Vasco da Gama. The Esmeralda was one of two ships that sank in a storm off the coast of Oman in 1503, only five years after Da Gama discovered the first sea route from Europe to India. After three years of excavation and historical and scientific research – the findings of which are reported on nationalgeographic.com – the archaeologists, which included teams from Bournemouth University and Oman’s ministry of culture, announced that they had fo…

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Tags: Archaeology Oman History Portugal Education Europe Middle East and North Africa Science World news Article News Esther Addley The Guardian Main section UK news

Shipwrecks at risk from fishing ‘bulldozers’

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They are some of the country’s greatest untouched treasures, having lain undisturbed on the seabed, in some cases for centuries. But now these archaeological riches are being destroyed at an unprecedented rate before scientists or historians can get their hands on them. That is the stark situation described by marine archaeologist Sean Kingsley, who says fishing boats that use heavyweight bottom-trawling and shellfish-dredging equipment are annihilating precious artefacts and sunken ships. Our desire for fresh scallops is putting our heritage at risk. Once shipwrecks have been struck by fishing gear, they – and their contents – are obliterated for ever Sean Kingsley, Wreck Watch International “We know what damage can be done by these bulldozers of the deep – trawlers that drag hundreds of tonnes of gear over the se…

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Tags: Archaeology Science Fishing Food Wildlife Conservation Animals Marine life Environment Features Article Robin McKie The Observer The New Review Discover

British ship from 1845 Franklin expedition found by Canada

The grisly and mysterious tale of two British ships that disappeared in the Arctic in 1845 has baffled generations and sparked one of history's longest rescue searches. But now, more than 160 years later, Canadian divers have finally found the remai…

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Tags: Arctic Canada UK news News Article Martin Williams

Mary Rose museum is a pearl - pity about the limpets

New buildings and ancient ships don't always make a happy couple. Last year, the new visitor centre for the restored Cutty Sark in Greenwich won the

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Tags: Architecture and design blog Museums Design Heritage Culture Cutty Sark Blogposts UK news Article Oliver Wainwright The Guardian Main section UK news

Join me on a voyage of discovery in the Southern Ocean

Oceans are enormous, dynamic and intimidating. Even in 2012, the best way to study them in detail is to float about on top, dunk experimental apparatus over the side and hope you don't get seasick. It's also a great way to remember how tiny and vulnerable we are compared with these enormous bodies of water. Oceans are like the heart and lungs of our planet, and they have a scale equal to that task. I'm a physicist who works in oceanography, and I'm in the Falklands getting ready to face the object of my study in the Southern Ocean. Compared with the historic journeys for which these waters are famous, we'll be travelling in relative comfort. No rigging to climb, no weevils in the food and no threat of scurvy. Our home for a month will be a British Antarctic Survey ship called the James Clark Ross which is dedicated to ocean science. We're starting and finishing a…

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Tags: Climate change Physics Chemistry Science People in science Oceans Environment Climate change Comment A scientific log from the Southern Ocean Article Helen Czerski

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