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    • Period to: MODERN
    • Institution: MAS
    • Sort: broadperiod

  • Thumbnail image of MAS-100017

Record ID: MAS-100017
Object type: MAMMAL REMAINS
Broad period: UNKNOWN
County: Essex
Workflow stage: Published Find published
This cattle mandible, or lower jaw, is comprised of two incomplete sections; cattle mandibles are rarely encountered in the archaeological record as conjoined pairs (Zhang et al. 2013). The smaller piece is an incomplete section featuring both pre-molars and molars. The larger piece is fairly complete, with the exception of teeth, extending all the way to the part in which the incisors and canines would be located. This front section is separated from the molar and pre-molar root holes by the diastema. Providing a relative date for this cattle mandible is challenging without further e…
Created on: Tuesday 18th October 2016
Last updated: Monday 16th January 2017
Spatial data recorded.


  • Thumbnail image of MAS-100016

Record ID: MAS-100016
Object type: UNIDENTIFIED OBJECT
Broad period: POST MEDIEVAL
County: Essex
Workflow stage: Published Find published
This assemblage of metal objects includes an iron handle possibly inscribed with letters; a lead sailmakers palm guard; a bronze scribe; a small gun powder measure; a cup; and what are possibly a musket ball and a rivet; along with several other metal objects of unknown function. All the items appear to be post medieval in date. It is thought that these finds are either being washed into the area from another location or are being exposed by erosion, as each visit to the location reveals more objects.
Created on: Monday 17th October 2016
Last updated: Tuesday 15th August 2017
Spatial data recorded.


  • Thumbnail image of MAS-1F5444

Record ID: MAS-1F5444
Object type: BEAD
Broad period: POST MEDIEVAL
County: Kent
Workflow stage: Published Find published
Twenty-six long drawn beads with a single cylindrical central perforation extending along the length of the bead. Varying in size, the beads measure approximately 25 mm in length and 8 mm in diameter, and some signs of wear are visible. The beads all have an opaque white core, cased in opaque red, cased in opaque white and finally cased in translucent blue on the exterior. The inner layers form a star pattern. The diameter cross-section is roughly cylindrical in the centre, whilst at the upper and lower ends the cross-section changes to become faceted in an octagonal shape, allowing th…
Created on: Wednesday 3rd August 2016
Last updated: Friday 30th September 2016
Spatial data recorded.


  • Thumbnail image of MAS-F100110

Record ID: MAS-F100110
Object type: POST
Broad period: POST MEDIEVAL
County: East Sussex
Workflow stage: Published Find published
Heavily eroded and abraded timber fragment with marine borer and growth present. As it is so worn, it is difficult to tell what type of wood it is and whether this fragment was originally completely shaped and worked, or just partially worked to achieve its function. The timber does not exhibit any evidence or staining from fastenings, however, there is one hole that could have been a fastening point at some stage. It is thought that this fragment may be a broken post or groyne timber that has come from a beach rather than material relating to a wreck. Groynes are wooden barriers bui…
Created on: Wednesday 23rd August 2017
Last updated: Tuesday 8th May 2018
Spatial data recorded.


  • Thumbnail image of MAS-F100107

Record ID: MAS-F100107
Object type: TRANSPORT
Broad period: POST MEDIEVAL
County: East Sussex
Workflow stage: Published Find published
This ship's timber is 830 mm long, 110 x 120 mm in profile, with truncated 25 mm diameter treenails; and a 385 x 65 mm slot for the supporting metal work from which the visible corrosion products suggest that they were of iron construction. The images were forwarded to ship expert and author Richard Endsor. The timber appears to be the beam end from a small ship, with evidence of knees on both sides. The small piece of plank let into it crossways may be the remains of a waterway at the side making this face the upper side of the beam. The treenails probably secured the plank. The notc…
Created on: Wednesday 23rd August 2017
Last updated: Wednesday 23rd May 2018
Spatial data recorded.


  • Thumbnail image of MAS-100004

Record ID: MAS-100004
Object type: CLAY PIPE (SMOKING)
Broad period: POST MEDIEVAL
County: Kent
Workflow stage: Published Find published
All three white pipes here are complete, and are of the short or 'cutty' form. Two carry relief moulded decoration featuring Masonic emblems (incorporating the crossed compass and square), while the third is in the form of a male head, wearing a thin-brimmed cap, possibly a military figure. Pipes with Masonic emblems were made from the mid-18th century in the UK, but remained popular into the early 20th century, while the male head falls into a group of more elaborate decorative pipes with bowls moulded in the form of human heads and animals, common in the late 19th and early 20th cent…
Created on: Thursday 28th July 2016
Last updated: Tuesday 29th January 2019
Spatial data recorded.


  • Thumbnail image of MAS-D100207

Record ID: MAS-D100207
Object type: BOTTLE
Broad period: POST MEDIEVAL
County: Kent
Workflow stage: Published Find published
Long necked glass bottle in clear or aqua marine glass. Overall height of 210 mm from base to finish, the height of body from base to shoulder being 120 mm. The finish being of the applied style, bearing a ring of glass approximately 15 mm wide over a further ring extending a further 5-10 mm down the neck. The base of the vessels exhibits a slightly concave punt <10 mm deep. In profile the body appears to be of a flattened hexagon shape, approximately 70 mm wide. the largest pane of the hexagonal shape being 45 mm across. The contraction from body to neck is severe, narrowing to 30 …
Created on: Wednesday 29th August 2018
Last updated: Thursday 26th March 2020
Spatial data recorded.


  • Thumbnail image of MAS-D100205

Record ID: MAS-D100205
Object type: TOBACCO PIPE
Broad period: POST MEDIEVAL
County: Kent
Workflow stage: Published Find published
Complete example of a clay tobacco pipe of the bent billiard style, probably dating to the 19th century. Overall length of 80 mm, with the stem being 50 mm in length. The "short stem" is circular in profile at the heel, changing to a hexaganol profile 20 mm from the mouth piece, which bears beading around the aperture. The left hand side of the stem, from the users perspective, bears a cartouche comprising an embossed diamond lozenge in turn enclosing an incised inscription of SQUATTERS OWN. The opposite side of the stem bears an identical lozenge enclosing the incised word SYDNEY. The…
Created on: Wednesday 29th August 2018
Last updated: Thursday 26th March 2020
Spatial data recorded.


  • Thumbnail image of MAS-O100169

Record ID: MAS-O100169
Object type: KNIFE
Broad period: POST MEDIEVAL
County: Isle of Wight
Workflow stage: Published Find published
Double edged blade covered with concretions, around 25 mm wide and 280 mm long. Displays iron oxidation, and the item has not been preserved well. The blade is roughly 200 mm long and the thicker handle is approximately 80 mm long. Following consultation with Henry Yallop of The Royal Armouries museum, this object can only be discribed as roughly the shape of a common blade form , i.e. roughly lenticular, and about 25 mm broad. What is not clear is whether it was once the complete blade, or that this is part of one, or alternatively that it was the part of another forged object, and o…
Created on: Saturday 20th January 2018
Last updated: Thursday 26th March 2020
Spatial data recorded.


  • Thumbnail image of MAS-D100133

Record ID: MAS-D100133
Object type: BOTTLES
Broad period: POST MEDIEVAL
Workflow stage: Published Find published
Two clear glass fruit bottles, one ornate green glass wine bottle, one tall brown wine bottle with glass hexagonal base (94 stamped on base) and one black glass bottle. The fruit bottles are 280 mm long and 70 mm wide. One appears to be more encrusted and discoloured than the other, but both are consistent in their shape. They possess straight bodies, abrubtly curving shoulders and straight necks running to applied finishes. One is still stoppered and contains what appears to be olives. Both are indicative of fruit bottles in style and shape. The two wine bottles differ in appearance…
Created on: Monday 23rd October 2017
Last updated: Friday 27th March 2020
No spatial data available.


  • Thumbnail image of MAS-D100129

Record ID: MAS-D100129
Object type: BOTTLES
Broad period: POST MEDIEVAL
Workflow stage: Published Find published
Two bottles with dark glass. Both appear to be 250 mm from finish to base and 50 mm in diameter. One bottle is dark green and the other black. Both have been encrusted and marked with biological activity, which could be mistaken for ornate symbols and badges. Neither are corked or stoppered. Both are very similar in style with straight bodies, rounded and slightly abrupt shoulders that lead into slightly bulging necks before an applied wine finish. From this shape and size, both bottles are assumed to be wine bottles, or perhaps liquor bottles from the 19-20th century. The finish of …
Created on: Monday 9th October 2017
Last updated: Friday 27th March 2020
No spatial data available.


  • Thumbnail image of MAS-O100124

Record ID: MAS-O100124
Object type: BRASS
Broad period: POST MEDIEVAL
Workflow stage: Published Find published
One ornate brass piece. The piece has an aperture in the middle, in the centre of a circular disc which is itself recessed slightly into the surface. The disc extends laterally into two leaf-shaped limbs, which are decoratively styled and form curved arrows at their tips. At the end of each limb there is a circular hole, which was likely used to fasten the brass piece to its host object. These holes are countersunk, presumably to accommodate the heads of screws. The piece is approximately 90 mm in length, with a width of 40 mm and thickness of 2 mm. The diameter of the two larger holes…
Created on: Monday 11th September 2017
Last updated: Friday 27th March 2020
Spatial data recorded.


  • Thumbnail image of MAS-O100234

Record ID: MAS-O100234
Object type: BARREL
Broad period: POST MEDIEVAL
County: Down
Workflow stage: Published Find published
This find comprises of the remains of three to four wooden barrels, which were buried in the intertidal sandy substrate of a pleasure beach. The action of the tide revealed the barrels and it is unclear how much of the barrels remain. End of the staves, lengths of timber making the sides of the barrel, are visible and clearly degraded. In some cases these give the appearance of flaring outwards, implying that only the lower portion of the barrel remains. At least one barrel exhibits inwardly projecting staves, suggesting more than half of the barrel remains. There is some evidence for …
Created on: Monday 15th October 2018
Last updated: Monday 30th March 2020
Spatial data recorded.


  • Thumbnail image of MAS-D100134

Record ID: MAS-D100134
Object type: HANDLE
Broad period: POST MEDIEVAL
Workflow stage: Published Find published
The stem of a silver fork or spoon with a hallmark pattern. The set of four hallmarks located together on the piece of cutlery indicates it was made later than 1781, when this practice was first introduced. Based on this image, this type of spoon/fork is possibly a Fiddle pattern - this refers to the shape of the handle - and is a type introduced in the 1780s and still in production today. The Fiddle pattern means that there are shoulders on the stem near the bowl, which is seen on this example. The lower end of the stem juts out around 90 degrees but this example may have been worn d…
Created on: Monday 23rd October 2017
Last updated: Monday 30th March 2020
No spatial data available.


  • Thumbnail image of MAS-D100076

Record ID: MAS-D100076
Object type: ROUNDED BOWL
Broad period: NINETEENTH CENTURY
County: Kent
Workflow stage: Published Find published
Six small convex bowls that may have also functioned as cups or tea bowls. All the bowls are made of a refined whiteware and three of them display a hand painted decoration.The term 'whiteware' is used in historical archaeology to denote refined ceramics with a whiter and denser body than pearlware that generally postdates c.1830. Whiteware is a class of ceramic products that include porcelain and china. They are usually, but not necessarily, white and consist typically of clays, feldspar, potter's flint, and whiting (calcium carbonate). It is thought that these examples may be tea war…
Created on: Monday 24th July 2017
Last updated: Thursday 5th October 2017
Spatial data recorded.


  • Thumbnail image of MAS-D100068

Record ID: MAS-D100068
Object type: WINE BOTTLE
Broad period: NINETEENTH CENTURY
County: Kent
Workflow stage: Published Find published
Two green glass wine bottles that appear to have the flat band-like collar around the rim which is typical of Continental (particularly French) wine bottles; the type appeared around the middle of the 19th century. This particular shape was - and still is - referred to as a 'hock' or Rhine wine and was one of the three dominant styles of wine bottles that bridge the time from at least the mid-19th century to the present day. Hock wine bottles are of German or French origin and during the 19th century, typically contained both red and white Rhine and Mosel wines. The distinctive shape…
Created on: Monday 24th July 2017
Last updated: Thursday 5th October 2017
Spatial data recorded.


  • Thumbnail image of MAS-D100065

Record ID: MAS-D100065
Object type: BOTTLE
Broad period: NINETEENTH CENTURY
County: Kent
Workflow stage: Published Find published
Six stoneware seltzer bottles, of a type used to carry mineral water from various Continental (mainly German) spas. The term 'seltzer' takes its name from the town of Selters in the lower Rhineland, one of the original producers of effervescent mineral waters. This cylindrical bottle type was used from the early 19th century through to the First World War. These types of bottles were produced by the specialist potters known as Krugbacker, or pot bakers, in the Westerwald region of Germany. These bottles, which changed little throughout the 19th century, were slender and cylindrical and…
Created on: Monday 24th July 2017
Last updated: Thursday 5th October 2017
Spatial data recorded.


  • Thumbnail image of MAS-D100066

Record ID: MAS-D100066
Object type: BOTTLE
Broad period: NINETEENTH CENTURY
County: Kent
Workflow stage: Published Find published
Four stoneware bottles (three large and one smaller) that were probably used for beer, ale, stout or porter. Stoneware bottles provided the ultimate in protection from the detrimental effects of light but were very heavy. They were produced in Britain in the 1800s and many bottles found in the United States were even imported from here. All of these bottles have a feldspathic glaze over an ochre dip on the upper parts of the bottle giving them a darker colour on top. Feldspars (natural rocks of aluminosilicates) are used in stoneware and porcelain glazes because they fuse only at hi…
Created on: Monday 24th July 2017
Last updated: Thursday 5th October 2017
Spatial data recorded.


  • Thumbnail image of MAS-D100042

Record ID: MAS-D100042
Object type: BOWL
Broad period: NINETEENTH CENTURY
County: Dorset
Workflow stage: Published Find published
Fragment of white ceramic bowl or lid marked with black and white geometric design and number '23'. Number appears to be hand-painted or stamped. Found loose on the seabed with a little marine growth present. This is a naval issue bowl probably used for drinking rather than smaller, handled cups, as they were more practical on board a ship. The number refers to the mess number, and the bowls were designed to be stored upside-down. The find dates to the late 19th or 20th century.
Created on: Monday 29th May 2017
Last updated: Tuesday 26th September 2017
Spatial data recorded.


  • Thumbnail image of MAS-100011

Record ID: MAS-100011
Object type: CLAY PIPE (SMOKING)
Broad period: NINETEENTH CENTURY
County: Cornwall
Workflow stage: Published Find published
This is a very worn example of a 'cutty' (short) pipe (total length 115 mm) with a round-based spurless bowl imitating a briar pipe, and decorated with multiple 'thorns' - small pointed protrusions around the stem and bowl. This type of bowl was in use between c. 1850 and 1910 (Atkinson and Oswald 1969: type 30), and the thorn design was one of the many decorative types popular during this period (e.g. Ayto 1994:11; Hammond 2009: figure 7). Clay tobacco pipes were manufactured (using two-piece moulds) in huge quantities in many towns and cities around the UK and were also imported fro…
Created on: Wednesday 28th September 2016
Last updated: Wednesday 12th October 2016
Spatial data recorded.


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